Piano Career Academy – Complete List of Tutorials

PianoCareerAcademy.com - Complete List of TutorialsHi everyone!

I launched my Piano Coaching Program at PianoCareerAcademy.com on 15th of February 2012Β  – and since then, our database of available tutorials has reached enormous proportions! πŸ˜€

This article is a special one: it’s a Table of Contents (I update it on a weekly basis!), containing the titles to ALL the video and written tutorials that are now LIVE on the Private Members Forum – exclusively for our online students! πŸ˜‰

I continue to post new video tutorials every week – so our ‘library’ is in constant growth! πŸ˜‰

By the way, if you want to learn more about the functionality of my Piano Coaching Program, please read our super-detailed FAQs!

So, here is the current list of tutorials that you can find on PianoCareerAcademy.com (it is structured according to categories and levels, so make sure you browse it until the end – the Video Course for Beginners, the Masterpiece tutorials and the Scale Course are just the tip of the iceberg!).

Step-by-Step Video Course for Beginners
(based on Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing)

CHAPTER 1:

Lesson No. 1: Getting Started. The 3 Main Piano Pillars. The Basic Playing Movements. Picking Out by Ear Easy Melodies. The Basics of Musical Notation.
Lesson No. 2: Playing one-staff pieces with one finger, non-legato. Involving the 2nd and 4th fingers ‘in the process’. Practicing pieces No. 8 – 12.
Lesson No. 3: Playing pieces on two staves, hands together (alternating pattern), non-legato. Double bar lines, repeat signs and rests. Practicing pieces No. 13-14.
Lesson No. 4: Playing with different fingers. Involving the thumb and the 5th finger. Easy dynamics and accents. Practicing pieces No. 15-19.
Lesson No. 5: Playing both hands together, portamento, with different fingers. How to play an interval? Practicing pieces No. 20-24.
Lesson No. 6: Playing on black keys. Tones and semitones. Accidentals and key signatures. Phrasing and mental anticipation. The basics of correct practice. Staccato. Practicing pieces No. 25-27.
Lesson No. 7:Β The structure of a piano duet. Major, minor and their character. Hand positions. Leaps and jumps. Additional staff lines. Practicing pieces No. 28-31.
Lesson No. 8:
Part I
: What is piano articulation? What is legato and how should we play it? Practicing piece No. 32 – 2 legato exercises.

Part II: Using the legato articulation effect in playing pieces. Playing leaps and jumps. The main dynamic indications. Practicing pieces No. 33-36.
Lesson No. 9:
Part I: Dotted notes and their duration. Transferring a melody from one hand into the other. Practicing pieces No. 37-39.
Part II: Playing both hands together simultaneously. How to play the melody louder than the accompaniment? Practicing pieces No. 40-41.
Lesson No. 10: Continuing to play both hands together simultaneously. Learning to play a melody with the LH. Portamento practice and its benefits. Practicing pieces No. 42-45.
Lesson No. 11: What is an eighth note? Incorporating eighth notes in our playing. Discovering new types of musical phrases. Practicing pieces No. 46-48.
Lesson No. 12: Continuing to incorporate eighth notes in our playing. Learning our first animated piece. Discovering new fingering principles. Practicing pieces No. 49-51.
Lesson No. 13: Musical meter and the main metric accent patterns. What is a syncope? Improving your staccato skills. Practicing pieces No. 52-54.
Lesson No. 14: Understanding hand positions. Wrist movements during portamento in a faster tempo. Practicing pieces No. 55-56.
Lesson No. 15: The 3/8 time signature. Improving our skill of playing both hands together, simultaneously. Improving our legato skills and our phrasing. Practicing pieces No. 57 and 58.
Lesson No. 16. The Bass Clef. Practicing pieces No. 59-61.
Lesson No. 17. Practicing pieces No. 62-63. Learning our first ‘piece for dessert’. Improving our posture and key attack, our staccato skills and our phrasing.
Lesson No. 18. Practicing pieces No. 65-66. Playing intervals. Articulation effects and their meaning.
Lesson No. 19. The 3/2 time signature and its expressive purpose. Analyzing our first polyphonic fragment! The raised 7th step and the harmonic minor. What is a chord? Practicing piece No. 67 and a piece for ‘dessert’.
Lesson No. 20. The dotted quarter note. Continuing to play both hands together, simultaneously. Practicing pieces No. 68-70 and a piece for ‘dessert’ – Berkovich’s Etude on a Theme by Paganini.
Lesson No. 21. Prima Volta and Seconda Volta. Imitation and Canon. Getting acquainted with the Intoning Technique. What is ‘Fermata’? Practicing pieces No. 71-72 and a piece for ‘dessert’ – an easy arrangement of the Main Theme from Beethoven’s 5th Symphony.
Lesson No. 22. What is an Anacrusis? Discovering a new interval – the Seventh. Learning how to play in Unison. Practicing pieces No. 73-75.
Lesson No. 23. Learning how to play with two different articulation effects simultaneously. Practicing pieces No. 76-77.
Lesson No. 24. Introducing sixteenth notes (semiquavers). Accents – notation, manner of execution and expressive purpose. Practicing pieces No. 78-80.
Lesson No. 25. Your first meeting with thumb crossings. Acquiring speed and dexterity – learning the basics. Practicing pieces No. 81-83.
Lesson No. 26. Rests and their expressive meaning. Getting acquainted with hand crossings. Practicing pieces No. 84-85.
Lesson No. 27. Continuing to incorporate 16th notes in various rhythmical patterns. Beginning to master 5-finger positions. Acquiring evenness, dexterity and speed. Practicing pieces No. 86-88.
Lesson No. 28. Incorporating dotted eighth notes in our playing. Practicing our first ample piano duet – piece No. 89.
Lesson No. 29. Practicing three pieces for ‘dessert’: Vivaldi – Spring. Handel – Water Music. Offenbach – Can-Can.

CHAPTER 2:

Lesson No. 30. Beginning Book 1 Part 2! Crescendo, diminuendo and fermata. Our first meeting with the sustain pedal. Practicing pieces No. 90 and 91.
Lesson No. 31. Our first encounter with a three-part musical form. Practicing pieces No. 92 and 93.
Lesson No. 32. Playing in the high register – posture recommendations. Acquiring freedom of movement for creating an expressive sonority. Practicing 2 piano duets – pieces No. 94 and 99.
Lesson No. 33. Mastering easy polyphonic structures. Training our skill of playing double notes. Learning the basics of voicing. Practicing pieces No. 95-98.
Lesson No. 34. The expressive purpose of the three-part form. The tritone. Improving our LH ‘obedience’. Practicing pieces No. 100 and 101.
Lesson No. 35. The octava symbol and its meaning. Practicing pieces No. 102 (a piano duet) and 103.
Lesson No. 36. The grace note – notation and manner of execution. What is a modulation? Understanding compact and wide hand positions. Practicing pieces No. 104-106.
Lesson No. 37. Mastering double-note leaps/transfers. Learning a new type of polyphonic structure. How to perform combined articulation marks? Phrasing ‘resolved sounds’ correctly. Practicing pieces No. 107-110.
Lesson No. 38. Getting ‘officially’ acquainted with the sustain pedal. The delayed pedaling technique. The two main functions of a tonality: the Tonic and the Dominant. The 5/4 time signature. Practicing pieces No. 111 and 112 (a piano duet).
Lesson No. 39. Your first ‘official’ sight-reading training session! The pentatonic scale. The simultaneous pedaling technique. Practicing pieces No. 113 and 114.
Lesson No. 40. Continuing to develop our polyphonic skills and our technique. The role of the thumb in piano playing. Practicing pieces No. 115 – 117.
Lesson No. 41 for ‘Dessert’. What is arpeggiato? How to play accompaniment chords correctly? The benefits of practicing without pedal. Practicing In A Sentimental Mood by Duke Ellington.
Lesson No. 42. The Rigaudon and its place in the Baroque Suite. Mastering our first culmination! Practicing pieces No. 118 (a piano duet) and 119.
Lesson No. 43. The importance of mental and aural anticipation in practicing a piece. What is a Gavotte? Practicing pieces No. 120-122.
Lesson No. 44. Learning our first Waltz! Bringing out contrasting artistic images in the same piece. Practicing pieces No. 123 and 124.
Lesson No. 45. Learning your first 3-part polyphonic piece. Mastering one-hand polyphonic structures. Getting acquainted with Mozart’s style. Practicing pieces No. 125 and 126 (a piano duet).
Lesson No. 46. Overcoming new technical challenges. The most common phrase ‘shapes’ and their corresponding dynamics. Practicing pieces No. 127 and 128 (a piano duet).
Lesson No. 47. Overcoming new polyphonic, rhythmical and technical challenges. Practicing pieces No. 129 and 130.
Lesson No. 48. Bringing our thumb crossing skills to a new level. Two main types of thumb crossings. Practicing pieces No. 131 and 132.
Lesson No. 49. What is a triplet? Practicing pieces No. 133 and 134.
Lesson No. 50 for ‘Dessert’. Getting acquainted with the ‘swing’ rhythm! Incorporating quarter note triplets in our playing. The Coda symbol and its meaning. Practicing Homework Blues (piece for ‘dessert’).
Lesson No. 51. Improving our voicing skills and our harmonic hearing in playing chordal structures. Taking our staccato skills to the next level. Practicing piece No. 135, In The Garden.
Lesson No. 52:
Part I: Improving our polyphonic skills by playing a Canon. Practicing piece No. 136.
Lesson No. 53. Practicing pieces No. 138 – Little Fisherman (a piano duet) and No. 139 – Valse.
Lesson No. 54. Practicing piece No. 140 (a piano duet) –Β Cavalry Song of the Steppe.
Lesson No. 55. Practicing pieces No. 141 and 142 – Studies. Playing with different timbres. The silent substitution of fingers.
Lesson No. 56. Practicing piece No. 143, Adagio – your first ‘serious’ romantic piece! Starting to apply a more advanced practice scheduling method.
Lesson No. 57. Practicing piece No. 144 – Minuet by L. Mozart.
Lesson No. 58 for ‘Dessert’. P.I. Tchaikovsky – style and most important works. Practicing piece No. 145 – Valse (a piano duet) from the ballet Sleeping Beauty.
Lesson No. 59. Learning how to practice and play a mordent correctly. What is a Bourree? Practicing piece No. 146 – Bourree.
Lesson No. 60. Continuing to develop our sight-reading skills. The 2/2 time signature. Practicing pieces No. 147 (The Little Boy) and 148 (In the Green Meadow), a piano duet.
Lesson No. 61. What is a Prelude? Playing triad chords correctly. Voicing the melody formed by the upper notes of a series of chords. Mastering jumps. Practicing pieces No. 149 (Prelude) and 150 (Exercise).
Lesson No. 62. Playing in the highest register of the keyboard. Continuing to develop our agility, coordination and voicing skills. Practicing piece No. 151 (The Little Shepherd).
Lesson No. 63. What is a Polka? Origins and short history of this genre. Practicing piece No. 152, Polka (a piano duet).
Lesson No. 64. What is a trill and how should we master it? Practicing piece No. 153 – Study.
Lesson No. 65 for ‘Dessert’. Johann Strauss II and his works. Creating orchestral timbres on the piano. Accelerando. Practicing a piano arrangement of Waltz No. 1 from The Blue Danube.
Lesson No. 66. The Phrygian mode. Remembering the 3 most important phrase layouts. Practicing piece No. 154 – Dance.
Lesson No. 67. Dmitri Shostakovich: style and main works. Motives, phrases and sentences. Franz Schubert and the transition to romanticism. Practicing pieces No. 155 (Song About a Stranger) and 156 (German Dance) – piano duets.
Lesson No. 68. What is a Musette? The Dal Segno navigation marker. Phrasing and logical accents. Transforming a ‘technical’ piece into an artistic one. Practicing pieces No. 157 (Musette) and 158 (Exercise).
Lesson No. 69. Developing our harmonic hearing. Staccato, coordination, LH agility. Choosing the most appropriate tempo for a piece. Practicing piece No. 159 – Birds.
Lesson No. 70 for ‘Dessert’. Mastering wide arpeggiated chords. Overcoming more complex swing rhythm & syncopation challenges. The una corda pedal. How to identify polyphonic structures? Getting acquainted with octaves and 4-note chords. Practicing Jazz Etude No. 9 by Milan Dvorak.
Lesson No. 71. Practicing piece No. 160 – Cradle Song (a piano duet).
Lesson No. 72. What is a Mazurka? Origins and short history of this genre. Practicing piece No. 161 – Mazurka.
Lesson No. 73. What is a March? Origins and short history of this genre. The Children’s Notebook op. 69 by Shostakovich. Practicing piece No. 162 – March.
Lesson No. 74. Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake: concept and subject. Developing our orchestral thinking and the ability to imitate different timbres on the piano. Improving our coordination and technical agility. Practicing piece No. 163 – Dance (a piano duet).
Lesson No. 75 for ‘Dessert’. A recap of the main things we learned in the first 74 Lessons! Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker: concept and subject. Continuing to imitate orchestral timbres on the piano. Practicing the Waltz of the Flowers from this ballet.

CHAPTER 3:

Program 1:
Lesson No. 76. Introducing 32nd notes (demisemiquavers). Practicing The Nightingale (polyphonic piece).
Lesson No. 77. Practicing Night on the River by Dmitri Kabalevsky (ample-form piece ‘replacement’).
Lesson No. 78. Practicing Children’s Song by J. Weckerlin (‘character’ piece).
Lesson No. 79. Approaching Etudes like expressive works of art. Practicing Study by L. Schytte.
Lesson No. 80 for ‘Dessert’. Practicing Beautiful Dreamer by S. Foster.

Program 2:
Lesson No. 81. Practicing Aria by H. Purcell (polyphonic piece).
Lesson No. 82. The Classical Period/Style and its characteristics. The Classical Viennese School. W.A. Mozart – style and main works. The 3 main types of cadences – perfect, imperfect and interrupted. Practicing Mozart’s Minuet in F Major, K. 2 (ample-form piece ‘replacement’).
Lesson No. 83. The double sharp and the double flat. Practicing Children’s Piece by S. Maykapar (‘character’ piece).
Lesson No. 84. Practicing 2 Studies by C. Czerny.
Lesson No. 85 for ‘Dessert’. The Theme and Variations form. The fundamentals of octave technique: learning to play octaves correctly, from scratch. Continuing to develop our voicing skills. Practicing Clubbed to Death by Rob Dougan (from the Matrix soundtrack).

Program 3:
Introduction and Sight-Reading Tasks.
Lesson No. 86. Practicing the Minuet in G Minor, BWV Anh. 115 by Christian Petzold, from the Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach (polyphonic piece).
Lesson No. 87. Practicing the Allegro in Bb Major, K 3 by W.A. Mozart (ample-form piece ‘replacement’).
Lesson No. 88. Practicing the Pedal Prelude in E Minor, op. 38 by S. Maykapar (romantic piece).
Lesson No. 89. Practicing 2 Studies (Study in G Major by Z. Zhilinskis; Study in A Minor by S. Maykapar).

Other Tutorials for Beginners:

The Benefits of Playing with One Finger at a Time (starting with the 3rd), by Alternating the Hands, in Practicing Easy Pieces for Beginners.

When Can We Move On From Hands Separately To Hands Together Practice?

Video:
How to Count Correctly and Overcome Rhythmical Difficulties. Bonus Lesson for Beginners (example – Piece No. 52 from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing).

How to Count 16th Notes Correctly (Depending on the Tempo of Your Practice).

Why There Are No Metronome Markings In The Pieces From Our Beginner Course.

The Most Important Tempo and Character Indications. Understanding the Tempo/Character Indications from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing. My video reply to Nguyen-Chi’s question from our Q&A for July 2016.

Video:
Correct and Incorrect Wrist Action: Avoiding Deliberate Upward Wrist Movements.

Video:
How to Avoid Tensed Wrist/Elbow Bends in Reaching Uncomfortable Positions (example – piece No. 57 from Nikolaev’s Piano School).

Video:
Using Horizontal Wrist Navigation for Making a Smooth Legato. Connecting Several Notes on a Single Arm Movement (example – Piece No. 66 from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing).

Piano Masterpieces – Detailed Video Lessons for All Levels

Late Beginner Level:

Polyphonic Pieces:
H. Purcell – Aria. Analysis and step-by-step tutorial.
C. Petzold – Minuet in G Minor, BWV Anh. 115 (from the Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach). Analysis and step-by-step tutorial.
Bach – Minuet in D Minor, BWV Anh. 132. Analysis and step-by-step tutorial.

Ample-Form Pieces:
Beethoven’s Sonatina in G Major. Analysis and step-by-step tutorial.

Classical Pieces:
Mozart – Minuet in F Major, K. 2. Analysis and step-by-step tutorial.
Mozart – Allegro in Bb Major, K 3. Analysis and step-by-step tutorial.

Romantic Pieces:
Tchaikovsky – Morning Prayer from Children’s Album op. 39. Analysis and tutorial.
Dmitri Kabalevsky – Night on the River. Analysis and step-by-step tutorial.
Samuel Maykapar – Pedal Prelude in E Minor, op. 38. Analysis and step-by-step tutorial.

Etudes:
L. Schytte – Study in C Major for the RH.
C. Czerny – Two Studies in C Major (for the LH and RH).
Z. Zhilinskis – Study in G Major.
S. Maykapar – Study in A Minor.

Modern Pieces:
Duke Ellington – In A Sentimental Mood. Analysis and Detailed Practice Guide.
Homework Blues. Analysis and Detailed Practice Guide.
Milan Dvorak – Jazz Etude No. 9. Analysis and Detailed Practice Guide.
Rob Dougan – Clubbed to Death (from the Matrix soundtrack). Analysis and Detailed Practice Guide.

Christmas Pieces:
Christmas Lesson for Beginners (level 1). Analyzing and Practicing 5 Easy Christmas Songs.
Christmas Lesson for Beginners (levels 2-3). O Christmas Tree. Boogie on Down to That Manger. Analysis and Practice Guide.

Orchestral Transcriptions:
Johann Strauss II – Waltz No. 1 from The Blue Danube. Analysis and Detailed Practice Guide.
Tchaikovsky – Waltz of the Flowers from the ballet The Nutcracker. Detailed Analysis and step-by-step Practice Guide.

Detailed Masterpiece Tutorials for Beginners that include MasterClass feedbacks:
Schumann – Happy Farmer from Album for the Young op. 68.
Schumann – Norse Song from Album for the Young op. 68.

Intermediate Level:

Polyphonic Pieces:
Bach – Invention No. 1 in C Major, BWV 772. Analysis and Practice Tips.

Bach’s Invention No. 9 in F Minor. Analysis and Detailed Practice Guide.

Romantic Pieces:
Samuel Maykapar – Pedal Prelude in E Minor, op. 38. Analysis and step-by-step tutorial.
Pachulski – Dreamy op. 23. Analysis and Detailed Practice Guide.
Liszt – Consolation No. 3 in Db Major, S. 172. Tutorial by Xenia Stolearciuc.

Modern Pieces:
Milan Dvorak – Jazz Etude No. 9. Analysis and Detailed Practice Guide.
Rob Dougan – Clubbed to Death (from the Matrix soundtrack). Analysis and Detailed Practice Guide.

Christmas Pieces:
Christmas Lesson for Intermediates (from levels 3-4). The Christmas Song. Good Swing Wenceslas. Analysis and Practice Guide.

Detailed Masterpiece Tutorials for the Intermediate Level that include MasterClass feedbacks:
Pachelbel – Canon in D.
Scarlatti – Sonata in E Minor, K. 198.
Kuhlau – Sonatina in C Major, op. 55 No. 1, 1st mov.
Haydn – Sonata in G Major, Hob. XVI:8.
Chopin – Polonaise in G Minor, op. posth.
Chopin – Waltz in A Minor, op. posth.
Eric Thiman – Flood-Time.

Advanced Level:

Polyphonic Pieces:
Bach-Liszt – Organ Prelude in A Minor, BWV 543. Real-Time Practice and Detailed Tutorial.

Ample-Form Pieces:
Beethoven – Sonata No. 14 in C# Minor, op. 27 No. 2 (Moonlight), 1st mov. Detailed Analysis and Step-by-Step Tutorial. Part II from our Q&A for July 2017.

Romantic Pieces:
Chopin – Nocturne in C# Minor, op. posth. Analysis and Step-by-Step Tutorial.
Chopin – Nocturne in C Minor, op. 48 No. 1. Analysis and Step-by-Step Tutorial.

Liszt – Consolation No. 3 in Db Major, S. 172. Tutorial by Xenia Stolearciuc.
Tchaikovsky – June (Barcarolle) from The Seasons op. 37a. Tutorial by Elena Lebedeva Millar.

Detailed Masterpiece Tutorials for the Advanced Level that include MasterClass feedbacks:
J.S. Bach – Partita No. 1 (Gigue).
Mozart – Sonata in C Major, K 330, 1st mov.
Mozart – Sonata No. 12 K 332, 1st mov.
Beethoven – Sonata op. 10 No. 2, 1st mov.
Chopin – Fantaisie-Impromptu in C# Minor, op. posth. 66.
Chopin – Nocturne op. 55 No. 1.
Chopin – Etude op. 25 No. 1.
Chopin – Prelude op. 28 No. 15, Raindrop.
Liszt – Nuages Gris S.199.
Scriabin – Prelude op. 11 No. 10.
Scriabin – Prelude op. 11 No. 11.

Important: the Lessons from the Piano Masterpieces project are NOT the only lessons for the Intermediate/Advanced levels available on our site!!! You can find hundreds of other tutorials for these levels below: Scale Lessons, MasterClass feedbacks, practice tips for specific pieces, tutorials focused on a wide variety of expressive and technical topics – and the list has only started! So please make sure that you browse our Complete List until the end! ;)

How to Practice Piano Scales & Arpeggios –
The Art Behind the Exercise
Step-by-Step Course

Please read this article before starting to follow our Scale Course:
How to Follow our Scale Course Depending on Your Level.

Important disambiguation:
Parallel vs Relative Minor/Major: Which Term is Correct?

Introductory Lesson:
WHY We Need to Practice Scales. The Benefits of Piano Scales and Arpeggios.

Bonus Lesson No. 1:
The Fundamentals of Scale Practice.

Beginner Level 1

Scale Lesson No. 1.
Part 1: Learning how to build a major scale. Setting a correct posture and key attack foundation. The two fingering groups. Non-legato (portamento) practice. ‘Pre-thumb crossing’ preparatory exercises.
Part 2: Learning how to perform thumb crossings correctly. Playing the entire scale legato. The contrary motion scale. The parallel motion scale.
Part 3: Learning how build and play triad chords correctly. Getting acquainted with the chromatic scale: fingering, hand/wrist position, practice tips, benefits.

Scale Lesson No. 2:
G Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale – portamento and legato practice; Triad chords; Chromatic scale: detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 3:
D Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale – portamento and legato practice; Our first additional expressive task – staccato; Triad chords; Chromatic scale: detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 4:
A Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale – portamento and legato practice; Additional expressive tasks – forte and piano; Triad chords; Chromatic scale: detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations.

Beginner Level 2

Scale Lesson No. 1:
F Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Triad chords; 3-note short arpeggios; Chromatic scale: detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 2:
D Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic and melodic); Triad chords; 3-note short arpeggios; Chromatic scale: detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 3:
Bb Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Triad chords; 3-note short arpeggios; Chromatic scale: detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 4.
G Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic and melodic); Triad chords; 3-note short arpeggios; Chromatic scale: detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 5:
Eb Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Triad chords; 3-note short arpeggios; Chromatic scale: detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations. Expressive task – crescendo & diminuendo.

Scale Lesson No. 6:
C Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords; 3-note short arpeggios; Chromatic scale: detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations.

Beginner Level 3

Scale Lesson No. 1.
Part I: C Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios: detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations.
Part II: C Major. Learning how to play long arpeggios from scratch; The chromatic scale in 4 octaves: demonstration, detailed analysis and step-by-step practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 2.
A Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 3.
G Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive tasks: staccato; forte/piano.

Scale Lesson No. 4.
E Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive task: crescendo, diminuendo.

Scale Lesson No. 5.
D Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive tasks: creating two contrasting emotional images.

Scale Lesson No. 6.
B Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 7.
A Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive tasks: staccato & forte/piano with a ‘twist’: exploring new characters.

Scale Lesson No. 8.
F# Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 9.
E Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive task: voicing.

Scale Lesson No. 10.
C# Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 11.
B Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive task: voicing the upper notes in triad chords.

Scale Lesson No. 12.
G# Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords; 4-note short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Intermediate Level 4

Scale Lesson No. 1.
Part 1: F Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Parallel thirds; Parallel tenths; Triad chords: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.
Part 2: F Major. Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 2:
Part I: D Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Parallel thirds (harmonic & melodic); Parallel tenths (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.
Part II: D Minor. Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 3.
Part I: Bb Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Parallel thirds; Parallel tenths; Triad chords: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive taskstaccato.
Part II: Bb Major. Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 4.
Part I: G Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Parallel thirds (harmonic & melodic); Parallel tenths (harmonic & melodic): demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive task – creating different characters while playing the same scale.
Part II: G Minor. Triad chords; Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 5.
Part I: Eb Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Parallel thirds ; Parallel tenths; Triad chords: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive task – creating contrasting dynamic intensities.
Part II: Eb Major. Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 6.
C Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Parallel thirds (harmonic & melodic); Parallel tenths (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords; Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 7.
Ab Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Parallel thirds; Parallel tenths; Triad chords; Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive taskcrescendo, diminuendo.

Scale Lesson No. 8.
F Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Parallel thirds (harmonic & melodic); Parallel tenths (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords; Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 9.
Db Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Parallel thirds; Parallel tenths; Triad chords; Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive task: the 3 main articulation effects – portamento (non-legato), legato & staccato – and the characters behind them.

Scale Lesson No. 10.
Part I: Bb Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic): demonstration, detailed analysis and step-by-step ‘magnifying glass’ practice recommendations.
Part II: Bb Minor. Parallel thirds; Parallel tenths; Triad chords; Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 11.
Gb Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Parallel thirds; Parallel tenths; Triad chords; Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations. Expressive task: creating different emotional images.

Scale Lesson No. 12.
Eb Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Parallel thirds (harmonic & melodic); Parallel tenths (harmonic & melodic); Triad chords; Short arpeggios; Long arpeggios; Diminished 7th chords; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Advanced Level 7

Scale Lesson No. 1.
Part 1: C Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Parallel & contrary thirds; Parallel & contrary tenths; Parallel & contrary sixths; Parallel octaves: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.
Part 2: C Major. Short arpeggios; Broken arpeggios; Long arpeggios; 6 arpeggios from one note: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.
Part 3: C Major. Diminished 7th chord – short, broken and long arpeggios; Dominant 7th chord – short & long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 2:
Part I: A Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Parallel & contrary motion thirds (harmonic & melodic); Parallel & contrary motion tenths (harmonic & melodic); Parallel & contrary motion sixths (harmonic & melodic); Parallel octaves (harmonic & melodic): demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.
Part II: A Minor. Short arpeggios; Broken arpeggios; Long arpeggios; 6 arpeggios from one note; Diminished 7th chord – short, broken and long arpeggios: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.
Part III: A Minor. Diminished 7th chord – short and long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 3:
Part I: G Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Parallel & contrary thirds; Parallel & contrary tenths; Parallel & contrary sixths: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations. Additional expressive task: creating different dynamic gradations while overcoming speed walls.
Part II: G Major. Parallel octaves; Short arpeggios; Broken arpeggios; Long arpeggios; 6 arpeggios from one note; Diminished 7th chord – short, broken and long arpeggios; Dominant 7th chord – short and long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 4:
Part I: E Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Parallel & contrary thirds; Parallel & contrary tenths; Parallel & contrary sixths; Parallel octaves; Short arpeggios; Broken arpeggios; Long arpeggios; 6 arpeggios from one note: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.
Part II: E Minor. Diminished 7th chord – short, broken and long arpeggios; Dominant 7th chord – short and long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 5:
Part I: D Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Parallel & contrary thirds; Parallel & contrary tenths; Parallel & contrary sixths; Parallel octaves: demonstration, detailed analysis and practice recommendations. Additional expressive task: crescendo & diminuendo.
Part II: D Major. Short arpeggios; Broken arpeggios; Long arpeggios; 6 arpeggios from one note; Diminished 7th chord – short, broken and long arpeggios; Dominant 7th chord – short and long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 6:
Part I: B Minor. Parallel & contrary motion scale (harmonic & melodic); Parallel & contrary thirds (harmonic & melodic); Parallel & contrary tenths (harmonic & melodic); Parallel & contrary sixths (harmonic & melodic); Parallel octaves (harmonic & melodic): demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.
Part II: B Minor. Short arpeggios; Broken arpeggios; Long arpeggios; 6 arpeggios from one note; Diminished 7th chord – short, broken and long arpeggios; Dominant 7th chord – short and long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations.

Scale Lesson No. 7:
A Major. Parallel & contrary motion scale; Parallel & contrary thirds; Parallel & contrary tenths; Parallel & contrary sixths; Parallel octaves; Short arpeggios; Broken arpeggios; Long arpeggios; 6 arpeggios from one note; Diminished 7th chord – short, broken and long arpeggios; Dominant 7th chord – short and long arpeggios; Chromatic scale: demonstration, analysis and practice recommendations. Additional expressive task: developing our voicing skills.

The Scale & Arpeggio Course is not finished yet! I keep posting new Lessons on a regular basis.

Sight-Reading Course

Read this first:
How to Follow our Sight-Reading Course: Structure and ‘Navigation’ Tips.

Introductory Articles:
1. Developing Good Reading Skills: Understanding How it Really Works.
2. The Fundamental Principles of Efficient Sight-Reading.

Bonus Article:
Should We Look at our Hands While Sight-Reading?

Progressive Sight-Reading Lessons:
Lesson No. 1: Notes and accidentals.
Lesson No. 2: Repeated and Neighboring Notes. Seconds.
Lesson No. 3: Scale-like Runs.
Lesson No. 4: Hidden Two-Part Structures.
Lesson No. 5: Thirds, Triad Chords and Seventh Chords.
Lesson No. 6: Slurs.
Lesson No. 7: Mirror Symmetry.
Lesson No. 8: Fifths and Sevenths.
Lesson No. 9: Octaves.
Lesson No. 10: Fourths.
Lesson No. 11: Sequences.
Lesson No. 12: Seconds in Chords.
Lesson No. 13: The ‘Alberti Bass’ or Hidden Three-Part Structures.
Lesson No. 14: Sixths (coming soon!).
Lesson No. 15: Chords (coming soon!).

The Score Collection (a supplement for the Sight-Reading Course, comprising 53 progressive pieces).

Piano MasterClasses

The videos/articles listed under this Category are not only individualized critiques to certain recordings – but also detailed tutorials about the pieces in question (that all our members can benefit from)! ;)

1st Edition of our MasterClass – November 2013:

My video feedback to Tobias’s recording of Pieces No. 13-18 from Nikolaev’s Piano School.

My video feedback to Eric’s recording of Piece No. 23 from Nikolaev’s Piano School.

My video feedback to Henry’s recording of Piece No. 134 from Nikolaev’s Piano School.

My video feedback to Abeer’s recording of Ellington’s In a Sentimental Mood.

My video feedback to Gary’s recording of Bach’s Minuet in G Major.

My video feedback to Kevin’s recording of Beethoven’s Sonatina in G Major.

My video feedback to Carol’s recording of Beethoven’s Romanza from Sonatina in G.

My video feedback to Essam’s recording of Chopin’s Waltz in A Minor.

My video feedback to Agata’s recording of Bach’s Fugue in A Major, BWV 864.

My written feedback to Chua’s recording of Bach’s Prelude & Fugue in Bb Minor, BWV 867.

My video feedback to Rebecca’s recording of Mozart’s Sonata No. 12, K 332.

My video feedback to May’s recording of Beethoven’s Sonata op. 10 No. 2.

My video feedback to Leia’s recording of Beethoven’s Sonata Pathetique.

My written feedback to Davichi’s recording of Chopin’s Nocturne op. 15 No. 3 in G Minor.

My video feedback to Dennis’s recording of Chopin’s Nocturne in C# Minor.

My video feedback to Neal’s recording of Scriabin’s Prelude op. 9 No. 1.

My video feedback to Kevin Q‘s Piano Improvisation.

2nd Edition of our MasterClass: January – May 2014:

My video feedback to Rhys’s recording of Pachelbel’s Canon in D.

My video feedback to Lila’s recording of Bach’s Minuet in D Minor.

My video feedback to Gordon’s recording of Haydn’s Sonata in G Major, Hob. XVI:8.

My video feedback to Camille’s recording of Mozart’s Sonata in C Major, K 330.

My written feedback to George J’s recording of Beethoven’s Sonatina in G Major.

My video feedback to Derek’s recording of Chopin’s Waltz in A Minor.

My video feedback to Linda’s recording of Chopin’s Etude op. 10 No. 1.

My video feedback to Alan’s recording of Chopin’s Prelude op. 28 No. 15, Raindrop.

3rd Edition of our MasterClass: November 2014 – April 2015:

My video feedback to Agata’s recording of Scriabin’s Prelude op. 11 No. 11.

A New Perspective on Whole-Arm Action and Weighted Playing: my video feedback to Henry’s recording of Schubert’s German Dance in A Minor (Piece No. 156 from Nikolaev’s Russian Piano School).

My video feedback to Brian’s recording of Chopin’s Nocturne in C# Minor, op. posth.

My video feedback to Pegah’s recording of Pieces No. 39, 41, 53, 54, 57 and 58 from Nikolaev’s Piano School.

My video feedback to Patricia’s recording of Bach’s Minuet in D Minor.

My video feedback to Roberto’s recording of Chopin’s Polonaise in G Minor, op. posth.

What is a Partita? The Instrumental Suite – Origins, History, Concept. Bach’s Partitas. My video feedback to Albrecht’s recording of the Gigue from Bach’s Partita No. 1.

My video feedback to Mari’s recording of Chopin’s Nocturne in F Minor, op. 55 No. 1.

My video feedback to Stephan’s recording of Chopin’s Fantaisie-Impromptu in C# Minor, op. posth. 66.

My written feedback to Neal’s recording of Debussy’s Prelude Ce Qu’a Vu le Vent d’Ouest.

4th Edition of our MasterClass: October – December 2015:

My video feedback to Emil’s recording of Chopin’s Nocturne in C# Minor, op. posth.

The Bio-Mechanics of Weighted Playing: my video feedback to Henry’s recording of Purcell’s Aria.

My video feedback to Anneke’s recording of Tchaikovsky’s Morning Prayer from Children’s Album op. 39.

What is Intonation – and How to Improve This Skill: my video feedback to Patricia’s recording of Ellington’s In A Sentimental Mood.

Tone Production: Improving the Quality of our Sound; Widening our Sound Palette. My video feedback to George’s recording of Kuhlau’s Sonatina op. 55 No. 1.

My video feedback to Alberto’s recording of Scriabin’s Prelude op. 11 No. 10.

My video feedback to Stephan’s recording of Chopin’s Waltz in A Minor, op. posth.

My video feedback to Aaron’s recording of the 1st mov. from Beethoven’s Sonata op. 10 No. 2.

My video feedback to Matt’s recording Chopin’s Nocturne in F Minor, op. 55 No. 1.

Questions & Answers

Q&A, January 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered:Β arpeggiato execution, practicing polyrhythms – with tips for each level, solving pedaling dilemmas in Chopin’s Waltz in A Minor, understanding the unique ‘personality’ of each finger, the relativity of piano playing levels, thumb positions in playing triad chords, concentrating during practice, avoiding discomfort in playing chords with the LH above middle C – and harmonic analysis.

Q&A, February 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: playing successive wide chords in a smooth, confident manner; mastering fast chord repetitions; increasing accuracy when playing on black keys; understating the term and concept of rotation; practicing the ‘2 on 3’ polyrhythms in Schubert’s Adagio in G Major; improving coordination while practicing both hands together; mastering the broken octave pattern in Mozart’s Alla Turca (3rd mov. from Sonata K 331); the mental/aural/physical parameters that impact the intensity, quality and color of a single note.

Q&A, March 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: the exact ‘edges’ of the < and > dynamic markings; understanding a piece before practicing it; phrasing in Chopin’s Waltz op. 69 No. 2; practicing the final arpeggiato chord from Ellington’s In a Sentimental Mood; ‘pressure release’ during weight transfers in legato playing; mastering the chromatic patterns from Jack Fina’s Bumble Boogie; proportional notation and performing freedom; stretching the fingers vs hand position changes; fingering guidelines for pieces without fingering indications.

Q&A, April 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: playing with two different articulation effects simultaneously (coordination tips for beginners); practicing double-note tremolos; avoiding shoulder pain when switching to whole-arm action; counting and phrasing – is there a connection?; staccatissimo execution in Haydn’s Sonata in C Major, Hob. XVI:50; the correlation between melody and accompaniment harmony; scheduling your practice efficiently; dealing with 5th finger hypermobility (double-jointedness); practicing double thirds; the ‘history’ of my holistic approach to piano playing and lifestyle.

Q&A, May 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: do we need to sing the pieces we’re practicing?; pedaling 4-hand pieces; practice tips for bringing syncopated patterns up to speed; adapting to unfamiliar pianos in recital/exam settings; the importance of sound balance and voicing; playing the black-key glissandos from Debussy’s Etude pour les Huit Doigts in a painless manner.

Q&A, July 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: the difference between pulsation and phrasing; the order of studying Chopin’s Etudes; piece No. 121 from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing; avoiding mechanical memorization while mastering a piece; how to play the octaves from the middle section of Grieg’s To Spring op. 43 No. 6; developing the ability to look ahead while sight-reading; the progress of our new website!

Q&A, August 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: playing the repeated accompaniment notes from Grechaninov’s Plainte op. 3 No. 1 with a continuous legato; practicing thirds correctly; practice tips for Czerny’s Etude op. 299 No. 24; coping with finger arthritis (with exercise demonstrations!); mastering the ‘2 on 3’ rhythm and bringing out the melody in Grieg’s Nocturne op. 54 No. 4; the best practice approach for an intermediate player who didn’t study the fundamentals correctly.

Q&A, September 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: practice tips for Tchaikovsky’s April from The Seasons op. 37a (solving articulation/voicing/phrasing/coordination/technical problems); how to keep older pieces in our repertoire; correct memorization; the role of our reading skills in mastering a piece; learning the notes of a piece vs learning the piece; practice tips for Liszt’s Consolation No. 3 in Db Major (mastering the ‘2 on 3’ and ‘3 on 4’ cross-rhythms; bringing out the melody; intonation, sound balance, phrasing; playing an octave/chord melody with a singing, continuous legato).

Q&A, October 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: practicing Brahms’s Concerto No. 1; performing big jumps quickly and accurately, without hesitation; Bach’s Fugue BWV 884 – practice tips for playing with a light staccato (in a quick tempo); pedaling tips for Scriabin’s Prelude op. 37 No. 1; avoiding a louder sound when playing with the thumb; the role of the knuckles in whole-arm action; when and how should we use the metronome in our practice?; can we keep our 5th finger straight for preventing the knuckles from collapsing?; practicing Bach’s Prelude in C Minor (BWV 934) for avoiding random stops and inconsistent playing.

Q&A, November 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: practicing the 16th note passages from Grieg’s The Poet’s Heart op. 52 No. 3 for achieving evenness, speed, fluidity (and correct voicing); learning whole-arm action – keeping the acquired sensations when switching to hands together practice; can we move our body while playing?; practicing the RH ascending chromatic fourths from Chopin’s Polonaise op. 53; practice tips for the Gigue from Bach’s Partita No. 4; practicing the double trills from Chopin’s Barcarolle op. 60; my place in the ‘piano pedagogy tree’ of the Russian piano school.

Q&A, December 2015: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: starting a trill from the main note vs the auxiliary note; how to avoid unwanted accents in piece No. 51 (Little Cossack) from Nikolaev’s Russian Piano School; playing the tenth/ninth stretches from Schumann’s Traumerei (from the Kinderszenen op. 15) without tension and pain; Chopin’s Sonata No. 2, op. 35, 4th mov.: artistic concept and pedaling tips.

Q&A, January 2016: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: how to determine the tempo for the Trio section of a Scherzo in Beethoven’s Sonatas (examples – Sonata No. 3, op. 2 No. 3 and Sonata No. 15, op. 28); the duration and amplitude of crescendos and diminuendos (depending on the type of dynamic indication [symbol or written word] and its expressive purpose [big dynamic changes vs phrasing micro-dynamics]); the main causes of speed walls; mental and technical solutions for overcoming speed walls (including in Bach’s Gavotte from the French Suite No. 5); varying the depth of our key attack for creating a wider range of sound intensities/colors/characters; achieving rhythmical evenness and a better staccato in Maikapar’s Children’s Piece (from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing).

Q&A, March 2016: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: the ratio of slow/fast practice; how to choose the tempo of slow practice; when, how and why should we increase the tempo?; the best fingering for the repeated notes from Bach’s Toccata in D Major, BWV 912; choosing the best editions for Bach’s Toccatas BWV 910-916; how to focus during a performance for playing several pieces in a row (and connect them into a meaningful program); do we need to adjust our key attack and sound intensity when using the sustain pedal?; how to avoid pressing the keys with the fingernails, and prevent the fingers from bending ‘backwards’; practicing away from the piano; achieving rhythmical evenness and improving the voicing/phrasing/intonation in the Theme from Rob Dougan’s Clubbed to Death.

Q&A, April 2016: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: avoiding exaggerated wrist movements in piece No. 23 (Jolly Ganders) from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing; Chopin’s Etude op. 10 No. 9 – choosing the best fingering for the LH and articulation tips for the RH; how to get rid of a collapsed hand dome; achieving lightness and gracefulness in piece No. 135 (In the Garden) from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing; coordinating two independent ‘musical layers’ in practicing Piano Space by Toshi Ichiyanagi; pre-hearing several voices at the same time.

Q&A, May 2016: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: can we learn a piece without the teacher’s demonstrations (as beginners)?; the benefits of using practice logs/plans (and my own studying experience); key attack, phrasing, pedaling, sound balance and practice recommendations for Chopin’s Waltz in B Minor, op. 69 No. 2; voicing and phrasing recommendations for Rachmaninoff’s Prelude in C# Minor, op. 3 No. 2; rubato/dynamic/pedaling tips for Tchaikovsky’s Old French Song (from his Children’s Album op. 39).

Q&A, June 2016: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: recovering from a wrist injury and re-training the arm/hand/finger muscles correctly; an efficient daily scale practice schedule; trill practice according to the method described in Heinrich Neuhaus’s book The Art of Piano Playing; using correct wrist movements in playing piece No. 18 (On the Ice) from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing; getting rid of ‘tension reflex’ in the back and neck muscles.

Q&A, July 2016: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Part I. Topics covered: random performing errors: why they happen, how to avoid them, and when to move on to a new piece/program; using conducting gestures during piano practice; avoiding confusion while learning the same musical material in different tonalities (example – Beethoven’s Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 5 in F Major, op. 24); remaining motivated and keeping the mind fresh while preparing only one difficult piece for an exam: ‘outside the box’ practice scheduling tips; the difference between technique and method in learning how to play piano.
Part II. Topics covered: improving the freedom, fluidity and amplitude of our playing movements; the importance of ‘breathing’ with our wrists; how to acquire a better velocity in playing scales; how to maintain focus and overcome anxiety during a public performance: training our performing skills; how to avoid sound harshness and acquire a more delicate and singing tone; what is finger articulation – and how can we improve it?; the importance of learning the fundamentals correctly before practicing difficult pieces; an overview of the most important tempo and character indications.

Q&A, August 2016: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: how to safely transition from a digital piano to an acoustic one; the physical, mental (intellectual) and emotional levels of listening to music; understanding the harmonic structure of piece No. 151 (The Little Shepherd) from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing; the main functions of a tonality: the Tonic, Subdominant and Dominant; how to play fortissimo notes/chords correctly, without finger/wrist pain; practicing scales in triplets (and with the metronome) – pros and cons.

Q&A, September 2016: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: avoiding nerve compression-related tension and ankle pain during pedaling; facilitating the dorsi-flexion foot movement (pedal release) in cases of reduced ankle mobility; the half-pedaling technique, and its use in Debussy’s Arabesque No. 1; can we use finger sliding during hand position changes?; the pros and cons of learning two musical instruments at the same time; the difficulty level of Brahms’ Intermezzo op. 117 No. 2 – and the required time for mastering it.

Q&A, October 2016: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: fingering alternatives for Berkovich’s Etude on a Theme by Paganini; how to produce a soft sound when using whole-arm action and weighted playing; practice recommendations for mastering a difficult fragment from Tovey’s Elegiac Variations for Piano and Cello op. 25; phrasing and rubato recommendations for Chopin’s Prelude in E Minor, op. 28 No. 4.

Q&A, November 2016: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: how to play narrow patterns (involving thumb crossings) in a comfortable and even manner; step-by-step tips for mastering the RH ‘interval’ passages from Pletnev’s transcription of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite (the Andante Maestoso part); how to avoid placing the fingers too close to the lid in playing the Gb Major long arpeggios; how to play the wide RH intervals from Rachmaninoff’s Etude Tableau op. 39 No. 8 without any strain or tension.

Q&A, January 2017: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: harmonic awareness: how to visualize the harmonic aspect of a piece; how to avoid tension and overcome technical difficulties (including speed walls) in Scott Joplin’s Maple Leaf Rag; how to avoid tension in playing the RH interval structures from Schubert’s Moment Musical in F Minor, op. 94 No. 3 (D 780): step-by-step practice demonstration; tips for sight-reading ledger line notes; avoiding a low wrist position in playing piece No. 136 (Ukrainian Folk Song) from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing (plus tips on: weighted key attack, relaxation, non-legato practice, wrist navigation, legato and intonation, phrasing, pre-hearing, objective hearing); can we create a convincing illusion of legato while making crescendo? dynamic/phrasing/articulation/character recommendations for the Coda from Bach-Busoni’s Chaconne in D Minor.

Q&A, February 2017: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: harmonic analysis of the middle section from Brahms’s Intermezzo op. 117 No. 3; Chopin’s Prelude in C Major, op. 28 No. 1: artistic concept and dramaturgy; phrasing and voicing recommendations; is there a difference of sonority/timbre between the soft pedal of a grand piano and that of an upright instrument?; ‘pulling the fingers back’ while playing – is this technique efficient? Examples of application.

Q&A, March 2017: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Part I. Topics covered: counting in English (vs other languages): are there any special benefits?; Liszt’s Liebestraum No. 3: analysis and step-by-step practice demonstration for the main culmination (bars 41-49); using overlapping during legato playing: understanding how this technique fits into the bigger picture; determining the type of legato (and amount of overlapping) depending on the character of the piece (examples – Bach’s Prelude No. 1 in C Major, BWV 846; Beethoven’s Fur Elise).
Part II. Topics covered: phrasing and voicing recommendations for Brahms’s Intermezzo op. 117 No. 3 (the Exposition); how to structure our daily practice: the concept of mindful (and flexible) discipline; how to achieve a feeling of accomplishment – and avoid ‘practice guilt’; the importance of good finger articulation/control in Mozart’s Allegro in Bb Major, K 3; efficient piano technique – the symbiosis between arm/wrist relaxation and finger strength.

Q&A, May 2017: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Part I. Topics covered: how to choose the order of the pieces when structuring a program: the main 3 criteria; how to successfully assimilate a new fingering version (after memorizing a different one); the genre/style of Nobuo Uematsu’s soundtrack pieces; how to avoid tension (and acquire evenness and speed) in playing the Alberti Bass accompaniment from Haydn’s Sonata No. 10 in C Major, Hob. XVI:1: detailed practice tips; vertical vs horizontal direction/movement: phrasing and voicing tips for Brahms’s Intermezzo op. 117 No. 3 (transition to Reprise); phrasing/voicing/pedaling recommendations for the Menuet from Ravel’s Le Tombeau de Couperin (Exposition).
Part II. Topics covered: an overview of the book Guide to the Daily Work of the Pianist by Nikolai Medtner; my Russian-to-English translation of the most relevant excerpts from this book; my opinion on the technical exercises from the last Chapter.

Q&A, June 2017: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Part I. Topics covered: returning to previously-learned pieces: is this approach suitable for beginners?; how to play the Presto section from Bach’s Flute Sonata in B Minor (BWV 1030) in a light, effortless manner (without any tension); fingering, tempo, phrasing, sound balance and dynamics/dramaturgy recommendations for Schumann’s Melody (from his Album for the Young); articulation and wrist navigation recommendations for Bach’s Prelude No. 1 in C Major (BWV 846), from Book 1 of the WTC (plus an overview of the dramaturgy of this piece); acquiring freedom of movement in playing piece No. 111 (Study) from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing (plus tips on: rhythm, key attack, articulation, dynamics); Duke Ellington’s In a Sentimental Mood: how to play the melody in a weighted, singing, continuous manner.
Part II. Topics covered: how does the aging process affect our ability to progress on the piano?; younger vs older piano students: strengths and weaknesses; how to compensate for the effects of aging – and make consistent progress in all the areas of our life (including piano playing).

Q&A, July 2017: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Part I. Topics covered: swing rhythm notation in Milan Dvorak’s Jazz Etude No. 9; why do professionals pianists use ample movements in their playing?; the importance of quick interval identification (and fingering anticipation) during sight-reading; how to get rid of bad technical habits (wrist tension, keybedding) and master the relaxed whole-arm key attack.
Part II. Topics covered: Beethoven – Sonata No. 14 in C# Minor, op. 27 No. 2 (Moonlight), 1st mov. Analysis and step-by-step tutorial.

Q&A, August 2017: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: practice tips for the descending arpeggio runs from Schubert’s Impromptu in Ab Major, op. 90 No. 4; how to choose the most appropriate fingering for a particular fragment; what muscles should we use for supporting the arm weight that does not go into the keys?; during an exam/concert, how long of a break can we take between pieces? how to deal with sweaty hands?; expressive analysis and practice tips for the Cadence from Chopin’s Nocturne in Eb Major, op. 9 No. 2; how to achieve sound evenness in playing a ‘broken’ 5-finger pattern.

Q&A, September 2017: My Video Reply to Your Questions.
Topics covered: should we adjust the mechanism of the sustain pedal (for making it lighter)?; how to create a clear and resonating sound (example – Bach’s Prelude No. 9 in E Major, BWV 878 [WTC, Book 2]); studying Rachmaninoff’s works: what pieces can we start with?; using ‘three-dimensional’ wrist/hand movements for avoiding uncomfortable LH wrist bends in piece No. 133 (Echo) from Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing; becoming a good accompanist: the basics of accompaniment/ensemble playing; how to avoid tension in playing stretched passages/chords with the RH in the low register: tips for pianists with small hands (example – Moszkowski’s Petite Etude No. 12).

Real-Time Practice

Advanced pieces:
Bach-Liszt – Organ Prelude in A Minor, BWV 543. Real-Time Practice and Detailed Tutorial.
Debussy – Arabesque No. 1. Real-Time Practice.

Musical Analysis and Practice Tips for Specific Pieces

The tutorials in this category were inspired from specific questions asked by our members (being focused on certain aspects of the analyzed pieces).

Late Beginner Level:

Video:
C. Petzold (Bach) – Minuet in G Minor, BWV Anh. 115. Practice Tips.

Video:
Playing With a Rounded Hand Shape. Petzold (Bach) – Minuet in G Minor, BWV Anh. 115. Practice Tips.

Video:
Graupner – Bourree in D Minor. Practice Tips.

Video:
Burgmuller – Etude op. 100 No. 4 (Petite Reunion). Mastering the double notes: practice tips.

Video:
Schumann – Melody (from Album for the Young op. 68): Fingering, Tempo, Phrasing, Sound Balance and Dynamics/Dramaturgy Recommendations. My video reply to Richard’s question from our Q&A for June 2017.

Video:
Schumann – Happy Farmer. Detailed Musical Analysis.

Video:
Schumann – Norse Song. Detailed Musical Analysis and Practice Tips.

Intermediate Level:

Video:
Bach – Invention No. 1 in C Major, BWV 772. Analysis and Practice Tips. The Benefits of Slow Detailed Practice.

Video:
Bach – Invention No. 1 in C Major, BWV 772. Avoiding Staccato.

Video:
Bach – Invention No. 14 in Bb Major, BWV 785. Voicing Recommendations for the Coda.

Video:
Kuhlau – Sonatina in C Major, op. 55. Detailed musical analysis (general concept, form, structure, phrases, dynamics etc.) and practice tips.

Video:
Scarlatti – Sonata in E Minor, K. 198: Detailed musical analysis and practice tips.

Video:
Clementi – Sonatina op. 36 No. 3: practicing the beginning of the 2nd half (1st mov.).

Video:
Anon – Allegro in F. Practice tips.

Mozart – Andante in D. Practice tips.

Beethoven – Fur Elise. Detailed Musical Analysis: history, form, phrases, melody.

Video:
Beethoven – Bagatelle in D Major, op. 33 No. 6. How to perform the trill in bar 3: 2 main versions.

Video:
Chopin – Waltz in A Minor, op. posth. Practice tips and pedaling indications.

Video:
Chopin – Wiosna (Polish Song op. 74 No. 2). Avoiding Wrist Tension in Playing the LH Accompaniment. Detailed Practice Tips.

Video:
Eric Thiman – Flood-Time. Practice Tips: structure, phrasing, dynamics and pedaling.

Intermediate/Advanced Level:

The pieces from this category are accessible for intermediate students, but can be be played by advanced pianists as well! ;)

Video:
Bach – Prelude No. 1 in C Major, BWV 846. Articulation and Wrist Navigation Recommendations. AnΒ  Overview of the Dramaturgy of the Piece. My video reply to Chung’s question from our Q&A for June 2017.

Video:
Haydn – Sonata No. 10 in C Major, Hob. XVI:1. Mastering the Alberti Bass and the RH Ornaments. My video reply to Monica’s question from our Q&A for May 2017.

Video:
Haydn – Sonata in D Major, No. 61 (Hob. XVI 51). Ornaments. Hand coordination – triplets vs 16th notes.

Video:
Haydn – Sonata in D Major, No. 61 (Hob. XVI 51). Which articulation effects are more appropriate for bars 29 and 42-43?

Video:
The Alberti Bass: Origins, Structure, Examples. Beethoven – Sonata No. 20 in G Major, op. 49 No. 2: Practice Tips for the 2nd Movement.

Video:
Schumann – Furchtenmachen (piece No. 11 from the Kinderszenen Suite op. 15). How to avoid tension in playing the fast chords?

Video:
Grieg – Butterfly (from ‘Lyric Pieces’). Detailed Practice Tips: analyzing and mastering the 5 main technical patterns.

Video:
Debussy – The Girl with the Flaxen Hair. Practice tips. How to create a soft ‘impressionist’ sound?

Scott Joplin – Maple Leaf Rag. How to avoid Tension and Overcome Technical Difficulties (Including Speed Walls). My video reply to Camille’s question from our Q&A for January 2017.

Advanced Level:

Bach – Prelude & Fugue in C# Minor, BWV 849. Detailed Analysis.

Video:
Emphasizing the Themes in Polyphonic Music – The Needed Key Attack. Example: Bach – Fugue in C# Minor, BWV 849.

Bach – Prelude & Fugue in E Major, BWV 854. Expressive Tasks and Articulation Tips.

Bach – Prelude & Fugue in E Minor, BWV 855. Practice Tips:
The Prelude.
The Fugue.

Video:
Bach – Prelude from English Suite No. 2. Concept and Detailed Practice Tips. Understanding the ‘Transcendental’ Nature of Bach’s Music.

Video:
What is a Partita? The Instrumental Suite – Origins, History, Concept. Bach’s Partitas. The Gigue from Bach’s Partita No. 1 – Detailed Tutorial.

How to Perform Hand Crossings in Bach’s Gigue from Partita No. 1? The basic rules of hand distribution and stem notation.

Bach-Siloti – Prelude in B Minor. Musical analysis.

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 12 in A Major, K414: How to Perform the Trills? The Rule and the Exceptions.

Video:
Mozart – Variations on a Theme by Gluck, K 455. Fingering Tips for the 2nd Variation (score attached).

Beethoven – Sonata op. 10 No. 1, 1st movement. Form Analysis. Recommendations for Creating Convincing Dynamics.

Video:
Beethoven – Sonata op. 10 No. 2, 1st movement. Mastering the LH in bars 30-35. Practice and pedaling tips.

Videos:
Beethoven – Sonata ‘Pathetique’ No. 8 in C Minor, op. 13, 1st movement. Detailed practice tips for the RH intervals and the LH octave tremolo.
Beethoven – Sonata ‘Pathetique’ No. 8 in C Minor, op. 13, 2nd movement. Detailed Voicing and Phrasing Recommendations.
Beethoven – Sonata ‘Pathetique’ No. 8 in C Minor, op. 13, 2nd movement. Analysis and Practice Tips for the Repeated Chords in the Accompaniment (bars 17-23, 36-50).

How To Determine The Most Appropriate Tempo For A Piece: A Holistic Overview (example: Beethoven – Sonata ‘Pathetique’ No. 8 in C Minor, op. 13).

Video:
Beethoven – Sonata op. 90, 1st movement. Mastering the LH in bars 55-64. Practice Tips.

Beethoven – Sonata op. 90, 2nd movement. Mastering the staccato chords.

Schubert – Impromptu op. 90 No. 1. How to play bars 5-8: staccato vs non-legato.

Schubert – Impromptu in Ab Major, op. 90 No. 4: Practice Tips for the Descending Arpeggio Runs. My video reply to Michael’s question from our Q&A for August 2017.

Video:
Schubert – Impromptu op. 142 No. 2. How to Play the LH Trill from the Trio.

Schubert – Erlkonig. Historical Background.

Schubert-Liszt – Erlkonig. Practice Tips.

Video:
Liszt – Benediction de Dieu dans la Solitude. Practice Tips.

Liszt – Liebestraum No. 3: Analysis and Practice Demonstration for the Main Culmination (bars 41-49). My video reply to Michael’s question from our Q&A for March 2017.

Video:
Liszt – Liebestraum No. 3. The Cadenzas – detailed analysis and practice tips: fingering, hand positions, technical patterns and pedaling.
Part IThe 1st Cadenza.
Part IIThe 2nd Cadenza.

Liszt – Orage (No. 5 from Annees de pelerinage, Suisse). Analysis and practice tips for the Piu moto section.

Video:
Liszt – Nuages Gris. Musical Analysis and Practice Tips.

Chopin – Etude op. 10 No. 1. Practice Recommendations.
Β 
Video:
Chopin – Etude op. 10 No. 4. Practice Tips (part I).
Chopin – Etude op. 10 No. 4. Practice Tips (part II).

Chopin – Etude op. 10 No. 4. Understanding the ergonomic structure of Chopin’s works. Discovering the technical ‘patterns’ and hand positions.

Video:
Chopin – Etude op. 10. No. 5. Practice Tips: Bringing Out the LH Melody.
Β 
Video:
Chopin – Etude op. 25 No. 1. Detailed Analysis and Practice Tips.

Video:
Chopin – Etude op. 25 No. 1. Fingering and Hand Position Tips for Bars 7-8.

Video:
Chopin – Prelude in C Major, op. 28 No. 1. Artistic Concept and Dramaturgy. Phrasing and Voicing Recommendations. My video reply to Alberto’s question from our Q&A for February 2017.

Video:
Chopin – Prelude op. 28 No. 13. Mastering the Polyrhythms. Detailed Analysis and Practice Tips.

Chopin – Prelude op. 28 No. 15, Raindrop. Musical Analysis and Practice Tips (+ written tutorial about the color of tonalities):
Part I.
Part II.

Chopin – Nocturne in Eb Major, op. 9 No. 2: Expressive Analysis and Practice Tips for the Cadence. My video reply to Sophie’s question from our Q&A for August 2017.

Video:
Chopin – Nocturne in F# Major, op. 15 No. 2: Analyzing and Practicing the Polyrhythms in the Middle Section.

Video:
Chopin – Scherzo No. 1, op. 20. Practice Tips for the Final Chromatic Scale.

Chopin – Ballade No. 1, op. 23. Practice Tips for the Coda: understanding hand positions and support points.

Video:
Grieg – The Holberg Suite op. 40. History and Musical Concept. Practice tips for Piece No. 4 – Air: mastering the fragment with arpeggiated chords in the LH (bars 40-47).

Video:
Rachmaninoff – Etude Tableau op. 33, No. 2. Practice tips: mastering the LH passages in bars 22-28; overcoming the technical and expressive challenges in the last 5 bars.

Video:
Rachmaninoff – Prelude op. 32 No. 5. Practice tips: mastering the main LH patterns.

Video:
Medtner – Canzona Serenata
(No. 6 from Forgotten Melodies op. 38): detailed practice tips for bars 38-49.

Video:
Cecile Chaminade – Automne op. 35 No. 2. Mastering the Polyrhythms: Detailed Analysis and Practice Tips.Β 

Video:
Ernesto Lecuona – Malaguena. Practice Tips: mastering repetitive close-position chords.

Debussy – Brouillards (Prelude No. 1 from Book 2). Analyzing the Rhythm.

Debussy – Brouillards (Prelude No. 1 from Book 2). Detailed Voicing and Pedaling Recommendations.

Video:
Debussy – Clair de Lune. Practice Tips.

Video:
Faure – Nocturne in Eb Major, op. 36 No. 4. Analysis and Detailed Practice Tips: Tone Color, Dynamics, Voicing, Phrasing, Pedaling.

Video:
Faure – Pavane (trio version). How to Create a Pizzicato Effect on the Piano?

Video:
Scriabin – Prelude op. 11 No. 10. Musical Analysis and Practice Tips: Main Expressive Tasks, Key Attack, Pedaling.

Video:
Poulenc – Nocturne No. 7. Voicing and Dynamic Recommendations. Analysis and Detailed Practice Tips for Bar No. 5.

Piano Playing Fundamentals

Video:
Developing a Brilliant Piano Technique – The Holistic Professional Approach.

Freedom – the Foundation of the Pianistic Art.

Becoming a Good Pianist – the Needed Qualities.

Learning How to Play Piano – The Power of the Patient, Mindful, Step-by-Step Approach.

Video:
The Secrets of a Correct Piano Key Attack.

Video:
The Basic Piano Key Attack. Mastering Whole-Arm Action in 5 Easy Steps.

Video:
A New Perspective on Whole-Arm Action and Weighted Playing.

Video:
The Bio-Mechanics of Weighted Playing.

What Muscles Should we Use for Supporting the Arm Weight that Does Not Go into the Keys? My video reply to Alexis’ question from our Q&A for August 2017.

Video:
The Correct Key Attack and the Importance of Wrist Flexibility.

Video:
The Fundamental Portamento Key Attack: Detailed Demonstration.

The Benefits of Non-Legato Practice.

Pressing the Keys Vs Pushing Yourself From the Keys – 2 Ways of Perceiving the Fundamental Whole-Arm Piano Key Attack.

Video:
Correct and Incorrect Wrist Action: Avoiding Deliberate Upward Wrist Movements.

Video:
Wrist Movements During the ‘Diving’ Portamento Key Attack.

Should the Downward Wrist Movement Continue After the Key Attack?

Wrist Movement and Its Main Functions: avoiding exaggerations when raising our wrists.

Wrist Height vs Wrist Action: Achieving Fluidity and Freedom by Using Wrist Flexibility.

Take A Deep Breath – Relax Your Wrist!

Improving the Freedom, Fluidity and Amplitude of our Playing Movements; the Importance of ‘Breathing’ with our Wrists. My video reply to Dom’s question from our Q&A for July 2016.

Video:
The ‘Cat Kneading’ Effect – a Metaphor for the Whole-Arm Action Principle. Finger Action in Pressing and Releasing a Key.

Video:
How To Channel the Force Coming From Our Back Into The Keyboard?

Video:
The Difference Between Whole-Arm Action and Separate Finger Action. The Benefits of Non-Legato Practice in Mastering Whole-Arm Action.

Video:
How to Play Deeply and Firmly, to the Bottom of the Keys?

The Free Fall of the Arm and the Gradual Deep Key Attack: Are These Techniques Compatible?

Video:
How to Ensure Accuracy During the Free Fall of the Arm?

How to Get Rid of a Tensed Playing Habit?

Improving Our Sight-Reading:
Part I:
General Sight-Reading Principles and Practice Tips.
Part II:
My Sight-Reading Experience;
Sight-Reading is Relative;
Focus, Horizontal Thinking and Mind-Fingers Coordination: a Step-By-Step Sight-Reading Guide.

Improving our Rhythm.

Piano Posture

Video:
The 5 Basic Elements of a Correct Piano Posture.

The Piano Posture and The Energy of the Sound.

How Far Should We Sit From the Piano? Finding the Golden Middle.

Video:
The Benefits of a Wide Arm Position.

Video:
How to Reach High or Low Notes on the Piano Keyboard without Tension or Discomfort: The Optimal Position (example – Beethoven’s Sonata Pathetique, 1st and 3rd movements).

Video:
How to Avoid Tensed Wrist/Elbow Bends in Reaching Uncomfortable Positions (example – piece No. 57 from Nikolaev’s Piano School).

Can We Move Our Body While Playing? My video reply to Agata’s question from our Q&A for November 2015.

Shoulder Pain: Causes and Solutions.

Getting Rid of Back, Neck and Shoulder Pain.

Video:
Shoulder Relaxation and its role in mastering the ‘whole arm action’ principle.

Is It OK to Stand Up for Playing Louder? The classical professional rule and the modern exceptions.

Piano Tone & Expression

Video:
Tone Production: Improving the Quality of our Sound; Widening our Sound Palette.

How to Avoid Sound Harshness and Acquire a More Delicate and Singing Piano Tone. My video feedback to Victor’s recording from our Q&A for July 2016.

Video:
Between Pianissimo and Fortissimo. Improving the Piano Dynamic Range.
Episode One: The Real Dynamic Possibilities of the Piano
Episode Two: The ‘Whole Arm Action Principle’, the Correct Key Attack and Their Role in Creating a Wide Range of Dynamic Gradations.
Episode Three: Weight, Speed and Height – 3 Variables that can Influence the Sound Intensity.

How Can We Embrace the Entire Piano Dynamic Range? Three Main Pillars.

How Can We Create Expressive, Gradual Crescendos and Diminuendos? Avoiding 4 Common Mistakes. A step-by-step holistic guide.

How to Produce a Soft Sound when Using Whole-Arm Action and Weighted Playing. My video reply to Patricia’s question from our Q&A for October 2016.

Video:
How Should We Keep our Fingers When Creating a Soft Piano Sound?

Video:
Sound Balance: Emphasizing the Melody. Playing with Different Sound Intensities Simultaneously. Examples: Khachaturian – Andantino; Schumann – Happy Farmer; Mozart – Sonata No. 16 in C Major, K 545; Chopin – Nocturne in E Minor, op. 72 No. 1; Chopin – Etude in C# Minor, op. 25 No. 7; Schubert – Impromptu in Gb Major, op. 90 No. 3.

Exercises for Developing Hand/Finger Independence and Coordination: learning how to play with different sound intensities and characters simultaneously.

The Importance of Sound Balance and Voicing. My video reply to Umi’s question from our Q&A for May 2015.

Video:
Mastering the Art of Voicing. Preparatory Exercises. Emphasizing the Melody ‘Hidden’ within Chord Structures (example – Debussy’s Prelude La Cathedrale Engloutie).

How to Determine Which Voice Should be Emphasized in Polyphonic Music. Example: Bach’s Invention No. 2 in C Minor, BWV 773.

Video:
Emphasizing the Themes in Polyphonic Music – the Needed Key Attack (example: Fugue in C# Minor BWV 849 from WTC vol. I).

Video:
What is Rubato? Origins, Meaning and Detailed Description. Creating an Expressive Rubato in Chopin’s Prelude op. 28 No. 6.

How To Determine The Most Appropriate Tempo For A Piece: A Holistic Overview (example – Beethoven’s Sonata ‘Pathetique’ No. 8 in C Minor, op. 13).

Video:
The 3 Main Articulation Effects: Non-legato (Portamento), Legato & Staccato.

What is Tenuto? Notation, Manner of Execution and Expressive Purpose.

Understanding Combined Articulation Marks.

Understanding Combined Articulation Marks in Impressionist Music (example – Jimbo’s Lullaby from Debussy’s Children’s Corner).

Video:
The Piano Intoning Technique and the Illusion of Legato.

Video:
What is Intonation – and How to Improve This Skill.

The Intoning Technique vs Legato: What is the Difference?

How to Create a Convincing Illusion of Legato While Making Crescendo. My video reply to Casper’s question from our Q&A for January 2017.

Using Overlapping During Legato Playing (examples – Bach’s Prelude No. 1 in C Major, BWV 846; Beethoven’s Fur Elise). My video reply to Chung’s question from our Q&A for March 2017.

How to Play Legato Several Notes of the Same Pitch?

Constructive Tip for Piano Beginners – Avoid Staccato!

Different Types of Staccato – depending on the artistic concept of the piece, the epoch and the style of the composer.

Video:
Finger, Wrist and Arm Staccato.

Video:
Bach – Invention No. 1 in C Major, BWV 772: Avoiding Staccato.

Understanding the Difference Between Articulation Marks (legato, staccato, portamento) and Phrasing.

Understanding the difference between legato slurs and phrasing slurs.

Video:
Piano Ornaments – Main Types and Manner of Execution according to the style of the epoch.

Video:
How to Practice Trills. Step-by-Step Guide.

How to Perform Trills in Classical Pieces? The Rule and the Exceptions.

Performing Grace Notes in Chopin’s Music. The General Rule and the Exceptions.

Should we practice with dynamics from the start?

Video:
How to Create a Soft Sound in Playing Impressionist Music? Practicing Debussy’s Prelude La Fille aux Cheveux de Lin.

What is Slap Touch (or Carezzando-Touch)? Exploring Debussy’s Innovations in the Realm of Piano Touch and Tone.

Piano Technique

Video:
Developing a Brilliant Piano Technique – The Holistic Professional Approach.

Always Start with the Expressive Purpose, Not with the Separate Technique. My written reply to Chung’s question from our Q&A for September 2017.

The Scale System in the Russian Piano School.

Scales and Arpeggios (score).

Playing Scales: Technical and Expressive Benefits. Using the Metronome – Pros and Cons. Analyzing Different Types of Groupings in Playing Consecutive Scales and Arpeggios – Triplets, Quadruplets, Septuplets.

Practicing Scales in Triplets (and With the Metronome) – Pros and Cons. My video reply to Pauline’s question from our Q&A for August 2016.

How we Practice Scales in the Russian Piano School.

Maintenance of Technical Work. The Importance of a Flexible Practice Session.

Structuring our Technical Practice: the ‘spiral of progress’ in practicing scales.

Video:
How to Achieve Lightness and Speed in Playing Scales? A Step-By-Step Holistic Guide.

Video:
Improving the Expressive Aspect of Scales and Arpeggios: Phrasing and Dynamics.

Video:
The Chromatic Scale. Rimsky-Korsakov – Flight of the Bumblebee. Practice tips.

Wrist Action In Playing Chromatic Scales.

The Chromatic Scale: When Should We Use the 4-Finger Formula?

Video:
Preparing the Hand Positions in Playing Triad Chords.

Video:
Mastering Position Changes in Playing Successive Chords – Detailed Practice Guide.

Video:
The Art of Playing Large Chords with Different Dynamic Gradations

Video:
How to Play Arpeggios? Mastering The Basics. Practicing Short, Broken and Long Arpeggios.

Video:
Short, Broken and Long arpeggios + written tutorial about long arpeggio fingering.

Long arpeggio fingering for the B scales.

11 arpeggios from 1 note – written description.

Building Triad Chords and Seventh Chords.

Understanding Inversions of Triad Chords and Seventh Chords. What is 6, 6/4, 6/5, 4/3?

Video:
Detailed tutorial on:

  • Basic triad chords and their inversions;
  • The main functions of a tonality: the tonic, dominant and subdominant;
  • What is a dominant 7th chord? Building the basic chord and its inversions;
  • What is a diminished 7th chord? Building the chord and understanding its character;
  • The 2 hand positions in playing diminished 7th chords;
  • Building 11 arpeggios from 1 note – C (with detailed explanations);
  • Building 11 arpeggios from A.

The Benefits of Non-Legato Practice.

Video:
The Basic Principles of Piano Fingering.

Video:
Using the Thumbs in Piano Playing5 Basic Secrets.

Video:
Three Types of Thumb Crossings. Mastering the ‘Flying Technique’ in Playing Scales.

Video:
Mastering the Thumb Passage in Playing Scales.

Video:
Performing Thumb Crossings in Playing Long Arpeggios.

Forming a Correct Thumb Crossing Habit.

Video:
How to Connect Two Consecutive Notes with a Sliding Thumb Movement?

How to Get Rid of a Collapsed Hand Dome. My video reply to Allen’s question from our Q&A for April 2016.

How to Play with Strong Fingers, without ‘Collapsing’ the Joints?

Starting Off Our Practice Session: Preventing Our Fingers From ‘Slipping’ Off The Keys.

Finger Independence: Between Myth and Reality.

Understanding the Unique ‘Personality’ of Each Finger. My video reply to Soheila’s question from our Q&A for January 2015.

Video:
What is Jeu Perle in Piano Playing? Practice Tips.

Video:
How to Strengthen the 5th Finger and Prevent it From ‘Sticking Out’?

How to Get Rid of the ‘Raised Pinkie’ Problem? Written+pictures tutorial.

Video:
Pointing, or Placing Fingers. Two Main Types of Finger Articulation.

What is Finger Articulation and How Can We Improve It?

‘Pulling the Fingers Back’ (‘Clawing’ at the Keys): Is This Technique Efficient? Examples of Application. My video reply to Camille’s question from our Q&A for February 2017.

Can We Use Finger Sliding During Hand Position Changes? My video reply to Beth’s question from our Q&A for September 2016.

How High Should We Lift Our Fingers in Playing Fast Passages (especially in Bach’s music)?

How to Practice Octaves? Tips for Pianists with Small Hands.

Video:
Avoiding Tension in Playing Uncomfortable Structures: Stretches, Octaves, Chords. Step-by-Step Practice Tips. Examples: Bach’s Prelude in E Major, WTC Book 1; Grieg’s Lyric Pieces op. 65 no. 1 and op. 68 No. 5.

How to Avoid Tension in Playing Stretched Passages/Chords with the RH in the Low Register: Tips for Pianists with Small Hands (example – Moszkowski’s Petite Etude No. 12). My video reply to Cicely’s question from our Q&A for September 2017.

How to Play Fortissimo Notes/Chords Correctly, Without Finger/Wrist Pain. My video reply to Golf’s question from our Q&A for August 2016.

Video:
Mastering Leaps, Jumps and Hand Position Changes.

Video:
The Layout of the Musical Text in Piano Playing and the Wrist Navigation Technique.

How to Achieve Technical Stability in Piano Playing.

Video:
Should We Look At Our Fingers When Playing?

Looking At Our Hands While Playing – The Myth And The Reality. My video answer to Jack’s question from our Q&A for October 2015.

Technical Development: Repertoire or Etudes?

Developing Expression and Technique – the method used in the Russian Piano School.

What is More Effective: Hanon, Czerny or Bach?

Horowitz – analyzing his technique.

Piano Practice

Video:
The Key Principles of Correct Piano Practice: a Step-By-Step Holistic Guide.

Work Smart! Tips for a Productive and Enjoyable Piano Practice.

The ‘Framework’ of a Productive Practice Session.

How Many Hours Per Day Should We Dedicate to a Piece? The 3 Practice Stages.

Video:
No Time to Practice? 5 Powerful Solutions for Lack of Time.

The Importance of a Flexible Practice Session.

The ‘Magnifying Glass’ Practice Method.

How to Effectively Balance Technical and Expressive Work During Our Practice.

Correct Practice and its Direct Influence on the Quality of our Performance.

Correct Practice – the Importance of Focus.

Should We Listen to Recordings Before/While Practicing a Piece?

Where to Start? A Practice Guide for Beginners.

Are You Overestimating Your Current Skill Level?

Should We Practice Pieces That Are More Difficult Than Our Current Level?

How to Decipher a New Piece: A Guide for Beginners and Intermediates.

How to Perfect a Piece and Bring it to Performance Level?

How Long Does it Take to Perfect a Piece?

Remaining Motivated and Keeping the Mind Fresh While Preparing Only One Difficult Piece for an Exam: ‘Outside the Box’ Practice Scheduling Tips. My video reply to Fern’s question from our Q&A for July 2016.

When Can We Move On From Hands Separately To Hands Together Practice? Examples for different levels (from my own experience!).

How to Know If a Piece Is Ready And It’s Time to Move On.

Random Performing Errors: Why They Happen, How to Avoid Them, and When to Move On to a New Piece/Program. My video reply to Beth’s question from our Q&A for July 2016.

Motivational Video:
Why Aren’t You Getting The Results That You Want From Your Practice?

Can We Learn a Piece Quicker? A Step-by-Step Guide for ‘Speeding Up’ the Learning Process.

Should We Use the Metronome When Practicing? Identifying and Solving the Most Common Rhythmical Problems.

Why There Are No Metronome Markings In The Pieces From Our Beginner Course.

How to Practice Polyrhythms.

My video reply to Ellen’s question about polyrhythms from the Q&A for January 2015.

The ‘Alternating Rhythmical Patterns’ Practice Method: Is It Effective? A Few Useful Exercises.

The Benefits of Non-Legato Practice.

Is Very Slow Practice Beneficial?

When And How Should We Increase The Tempo When Practicing?

The Ratio of Slow/Fast Practice: my video reply to Dom’s question from the Q&A for March 2016.

How To Determine The Most Appropriate Tempo For A Piece: A Holistic Overview (example – Beethoven’s Sonata ‘Pathetique’ No. 8 in C Minor, op. 13).

Avoiding Confusion While Learning the Same Musical Material in Different Tonalities (example – Beethoven’s Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 5 in F Major, op. 24). My video reply to Mike’s question from our Q&A for July 2016.

Starting Off Our Practice Session: Preventing Our Fingers From ‘Slipping’ Off The Keys.

Motivational Video:
When to Take a Break in Your Practice.

Practicing Away from the Piano. Resuming Our Practice After a Vacation.

Piano Performance

Studying Piano – How to Cope With Exams? 7 Basic Steps.

Overcoming Performance Anxiety While Preparing For an Upcoming Performance.

How to Maintain Focus and Overcome Anxiety During a Public Performance: Training Our Performing Skills. My video reply to Pauline’s question from our Q&A for July 2016.

How to Choose the Order of the Pieces when Structuring a Program: the Main 3 Criteria. My video reply to Ashleigh’s question from our Q&A for May 2017.

Getting Ready for a Recital.

Putting Together a Recital: Balancing Our Practice.

Getting Ready for an Exam: Increasing Our Confidence.

Getting Ready for an Exam – The Final Stage

Concentrating Before a Performance

Maintaining a Calm, Focused State of Mind During Exams

How to Adjust to the Concert/Exam/Audition Piano.

During an Exam/Concert, How Long of a Break Can We Take Between Pieces? My video reply to Kelvin’s question from our Q&A for August 2017.

Video:
Dealing with Performance Anxiety – a Scientific Approach.

Active Playing vs Passive Playing. Making the Difference Between Relaxation and Passivity.

How to Deal with Shaking Hands?

Cold Hands Before Exams/Concerts: Causes and Solutions.

How to Deal with Sweaty Hands? My video reply to Kelvin’s question from our Q&A for August 2017.

Practicing your ‘Performing Skills’: the 300%-200%-100% Principle:
Part I
Part II

Emotional Display and the ‘Acting’ Part of Piano Playing:
Part I
Part II

Becoming a Good Accompanist: the Basics of Accompaniment/Ensemble Playing. My video reply to Kelvin’s question from our Q&A for September 2017.

Piano Repertoire
(Repertoire Advice and Exclusive Scores)

The Repertoire Approach in the Russian Piano School.

Exploring the Piano Repertoire.

How to Determine the Level of a Student (or the Level of a Piece)? Piano Playing Levels and Their Relativity.

Are You Overestimating Your Current Skill Level?

What is Urtext? Should We Use Urtext or Edited Scores when Playing Bach?

Which are the Best Piano Editions?

How to Retain Old Pieces in our Repertoire: Practice and Scheduling Tips.

Returning to Previously-Learned Pieces: Is This Approach Suitable for Beginners? My video reply to Bea’s question from our Q&A for June 2017.

Nikolaev – Russian School of Piano Playing (levels 1-3).

Artobolevskaia – Piano Chrestomathy (levels 1-4).

Milich – Graded Piano Repertoire (levels 1-7).

Studying J.S. Bach’s Works – The Methodical Order. The 5 Main Steps of Mastery.

J.S. Bach – Polyphonic Pieces for the Intermediate Level: Repertoire Suggestions.

J.S. Bach – Inventions and Sinfonias (from level 4).

J.S. Bach – The Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach (levels 2-5).

J.S. Bach – Little Preludes and Fugues (levels 3-8).

J.S. Bach – 6 Clavier Partitas BWV 825-830 (from level 7).

Haydn – Arietta with 12 Variations in Eb Major, Hob. XVII:3 (levels 2-6).

Clementi – 7 Sonatinas (levels 3-6).

Mozart-Liszt – Lacrimosa (from level 7).

Gedike – 30 Easy Pieces (levels 1-3).

Schumann – Album for the Young op. 68 (levels 1-5).

Tchaikovsky – Children’s Album op. 39 (levels 2-5).

Debussy – Children’s Corner (levels 4-8).

Bela Bartok – Mikrokosmos Sz. 107 (levels 1-8).

Gluck-Sgambati – Melodie from Orfeo ed Euridice (from level 7).

Grieg – The Holberg Suite op. 40 (score, history, musical concept and video tutorial).

Studying Rachmaninoff’s Works: What Pieces Can We Start With? Repertoire Suggestions for Late-Intermediate and Advanced Students. My video reply to Alberto’s question from our Q&A for September 2017.

Etudes – Detailed Repertoire Recommendations, levels 1-8 (scores attached).

Easy Christmas Songs Arranged for Beginners and Intermediates (scores and detailed video tutorial).

Romantic Pieces and Sonatinas for Beginners – Suggestions.

Polyphonic and Romantic Pieces for Beginners (levels 2-3) – Suggestions.

Choosing a Piano Program: Where to Start? Recommendations and Repertoire Plans for Early-Intermediate Students.

Ample-Form and Romantic Pieces for the Intermediate Level – Suggestions.

Chopin’s Mazurkas – Suggestions for the Intermediate Level.

Impressionist Music: Where to Begin? Repertoire Suggestions for Intermediate Students.

Playing Four-Part Pieces: Where to Begin? Repertoire Suggestions and Practice/Sight-Reading Tips for Early-Intermediate Students.

Piano Duets (4-Hand Pieces) for the Intermediate Level – Suggestions and Scores.

Repertoire Recommendations for Advanced Students and Piano Teachers.

Piano Duets for Advanced Students – Repertoire Suggestions and Scores.

Piano Pedal

Video:
Using the Piano Pedals – The Art Behind the Mechanism.

Video:
How to Use the Sustain Pedal Correctly: The Bio-Mechanics of a Healthy Piano Pedaling Technique.

Video:
Partial Pedaling and The Half-Pedaling Technique.

Beginning to Play with Pedal. Tips for Beginners.

The ‘Breathing Pedal’ – a General Overview.

Tchaikovsky – In Church from Children’s Album op. 39. Pedaling Guide.

Mozart – Sonata No. 2 in F Major, K 280. Pedaling Tips for the 1st and 2nd Movements.

Video:
Mozart – Sonata No. 2 in F Major, K 280. Pedaling Tips for the 2nd Movement.

Video:
Mozart – Sonata No. 13 in Bb Major, K 333. Pedaling Tips for the 2nd Movement.

Beethoven – Rondo in C Major, op. 51 No. 1. Pedaling and Tempo Suggestions.

Video:
Schubert – Impromptu op. 90 No. 2. Pedaling Recommendations.

Video:
Chopin – Nocturne in F# Major, op. 15 No. 2. Pedaling Recommendations.

Video:
Chopin – Mazurka in Ab Major, op. posth. Pedaling Recommendations.

Debussy – Brouillards (Prelude No. 1 from Book 2). Detailed Voicing and Pedaling Recommendations.

Piano Mind

How to Memorize a Piece? A Step-by-Step Holistic Guide.

How to Analyze and Understand a Piano Piece: Step-by-Step Guide.

The Power of Our Subconscious Mind in Learning to Play Piano.

The 3 ‘Layers’ of a Musical Piece: Details, Phrases and the Whole.

How to Understand the ‘Message’ of a Piece? A General Overview.

Expressing the Meaning of a Piece: Abstract Music and Program Music.

Phrasing and the Meaning of the Piece. The message encoded in classical/pre-classical music.

Should We Listen to Recordings Before/While Practicing a Piece?

Awakening Our Creativity: Mastering the Art of Piano Improvisation.

Overcoming Mental Blockages in Piano Playing

Overcoming Routine in Our Practice: (Re)-Finding Inspiration.

Motivational Video:
Measuring The Results of Our Practice: Finding the Balance Between Two Different Mindsets.

Reaching our Piano Goals: How Far Can We Go?

The Physical, Mental (Intellectual) and Emotional Levels of Listening to Music. My video reply to Riku’s question from our Q&A for August 2016.

Aural Training: Developing our Objective Hearing.

Pre-Hearing: Visualizing the Sound Before Pressing the Keys.

How to Hear (Visualize) the Music with our Inner Hearing While Playing?

How Can we Train our Ability of Visualizing the Emotional Content of a Piece?

How to Handle Failures in Piano Playing? 16 Perspective-Changing Steps.

Reaching Harmony: The Power of a Holistic Approach in Piano Playing.

Increase Your Productivity: Declutter Your Practice Space and Your Mind.

Video:
No Time to Practice? 5 Powerful Solutions for Lack of Time.

How Can We Fit Everything In Without Feeling Overwhelmed?

The Pros and Cons of Learning Two Musical Instruments at the Same Time. My video reply to Fern’s question from our Q&A for September 2016.

Piano Theory

All Tonalities and their Key Signatures (easy charts posted under Lesson No. 6 for Beginners).

What Are Intervals?

The Circle of Fifths.

Tonalities, Modes and Chromaticism.

The 7 Musical Modes.

Parallel vs Relative Minor/Major: Which Term is Correct?

Natural, Harmonic and Melodic Minor.

Understanding Inversions of Triad Chords and Seventh Chords. What is 6, 6/4, 6/5, 4/3?

What is Syncopation?

Examples of Syncopation in Pre-Classical, Classical and Romantic Music.

Harmony and Expression: Learning how to Decipher the Meaning Encoded in Different Harmonies and Chord Progressions.

Harmonic Awareness (Analysis) as a Means of Expression: How to Visualize the Harmonic Aspect of a Piece. My video reply to Alberto’s question from our Q&A for January 2017.

The Main Types of Cadences and Their Meaning.

What are Motives, Phrases and Themes?

How to Identify a Musical Phrase?

Solfeggio in the Russian Music Schools.

The Fixed Do/Movable Do Methods. Which One is Better?

What are Ample-Form Pieces? Sonatinas and Sonatas – Structure and Benefits.

What are Variations and Movements?

The 3 Main Musical Textures: Monophony, Homophony, Polyphony. Understanding the Structure of Polyphonic Music

How to Identify the Voices of a Polyphonic Piece. Example – Bach’s Fugue in G minor, BWV 861.

The Rules of Stem Notation. Examples from Polyphonic and Homophonic Music.

Hand Distribution and Stem Notation. Understanding Two- and Three-Staff Structures.

What is a ‘performance score’? Analyzing unusual time signatures.

Using Composition as a Means of Learning.

Piano History

Understanding the Evolution of the Major Musical Styles: Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Modernist. Reflecting the Style of the Epoch/Composer in our Performance.

What is a Partita? The Instrumental Suite – Origins, History, Concept. Bach’s Partitas BWV 825-830.

Mozart and the Intellectual Values Encoded in Classical Music.

Schubert – Erlkonig. Historical Background.

Musical Impressionism. Origins and main pianistic characteristics.

Satie- Trois Sarabandes: History, Concept, Meaning, Expression.

Alexandr Scriabin – Personality, Philosophical Views and Stylistic Evolution.

Piano Teaching

The Studying System in The Russian Piano School.

How to Start Teaching Piano?

How to Determine the Level of a Student (or the Level of a Piece)? Piano Playing Levels and Their Relativity.

The Structure of a Piano Lesson: Evaluating a Student.

Should Children Start Taking Piano Lessons at a Very Young Age (3-5)?

The Expressive Benefits of Singing Songs with Words during The First Piano Lessons.

Wrist Movements According to the Duration of the Note: How to Explain this Concept to Beginners?

Teaching Beginners How to Play with Strong Fingers, without ‘Collapsing’ the Joints.

How to Help Intermediate Students Get Rid of a Tensed Playing Habit?

Incorporating Theory in Piano Lessons.

The Suzuki Method – the basic principles.

How Long Should We Study With One Teacher?

Piano Health

Breathing Correctly While Playing.

Hand/Wrist Pain? Find Out What You’re Doing Wrong!

How to Deal with Piano Practice Related Hand Injuries and Muscle Pain?

Arm/Wrist Pain and Discomfort: A Symptom of Incorrect Practice. Main Causes and Solutions.

Wrist Tension – a Mega-Cause of Hand Injuries. A Holistic Overview.

Shoulder Pain: Causes and Solutions.

Avoiding Shoulder Pain When Switching to Whole-Arm Action. My video reply to Asha’s question from our Q&A for April 2015.

Dealing with Thumb Injuries: Correct and Incorrect Thumb Positions.

How to Compensate Your Daily Piano Practice Routine?

Keep Your Hands Strong and Your Mind Open.

How to Get Rid of Cold Hands? Tips for Pianists.

Cold Hands Before Exams/Concerts: Causes and Solutions.

Video:
Workout Tutorials are Coming Soon!

Video:
Wrist, Arm & Shoulder Warm-Up for Pianists

Video:
Spine Warm-Up and Back Exercises for Pianists.

Get Inspired!

Motivational Video:
Piano Playing is a Lifetime Commitment!

Motivational Video:
The Power of Perseverance in Learning to Play Piano: Why Musical Progress is Not Linear.

Motivational Video:
The Rejuvenating Powers of Piano Playing.

Does the Aging Process Affect our Ability to Progress on the Piano? How to Compensate for the Effects of Aging. My video reply to Dinah’s question from our Q&A for June 2017.

Video:
Inspirational Video About the Oldest Pianist in the World!

Video:
How Playing an Instrument Benefits Your Brain.

Overview (and Partial Translation) of the Russian Book Guide to the Daily Work of the Pianist by Nikolai Medtner. My video reply to Alberto’s question from our Q&A for May 2017.

Video:
Murray Perahia about Schumann’s “Kinderszenen” op. 15.

Video:
An Inspirational Interview with Arthur Rubinstein.

Video:
Vladimir Ashkenazy’s Message for Aspiring Pianists.

Video:
Anne-Sophie Mutter: What Every Musician Should Know That You Can’t Learn in School.

Video:
Daniel Barenboim About the Holistic Nature of Music.

Video:
Valentina Lisitsa Talks About Mindful Practice.

Video:
Valentina Lisitsa on Key Attack and Sound Production.

Video:
Benjamin Zander on Music and Passion

Video:
Dealing with Performance Anxiety – a Scientific Approach.

Video:
The Art Of Piano Great Pianists Of The 20Th Century.

Exploring Our Instrument

Choosing the best digital piano for home use:
Part I
Part II

How to Safely Transition from a Digital Piano to an Acoustic One. My video reply to Beth’s question from our Q&A for August 2016.

The Harpsichord, the Acoustic Piano and the Digital Piano: learning to see the ‘connecting dots’.

The Harpsichord and the Clavichord.

In order to get full access to all these tutorials and to many other exclusive piano playing tips, join my Piano Coaching Program at PianoCareerAcademy.com today – and learn the secrets of the Russian piano school! 8)

Many new articles and video tutorials are coming soon on PianoCareer.com. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter or Google + (and now also on Pinterest!) to get instant updates, support and motivation! πŸ˜‰

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

19 Responses to “Piano Career Academy – Complete List of Tutorials”

Read below or add a comment...

  1. Neil says:

    Help! I want to register for the Private members forum, but it keeps saying its disabled.

    • Ilinca says:

      Hi Neil!

      For registering for my Piano Coaching Program, you have to go to the home page on PianoCareerAcademy.com, wait for the video to load (you can watch it till the end to learn more about the entire project!) and then select a membership option below the video.

      There are two membership options – monthly and yearly. After deciding which type of membership you prefer, you’ll be directed towards a Forum Account Creation page, where you’ll have to fill in your username and password. With this information, I will activate your account – and you’ll be able to enjoy all the exclusive resources of our forum, ask questions, receive detailed professional answers – and many other useful things! πŸ˜‰

      If you have other questions, please let me know!

      Best wishes,
      Ilinca

      • Christopher says:

        Hi Ilinca,

        I am currently taking lessons from a concert pianist. He says that you have to raise your wrists and then come down when playing every note. I am having a hard time with this. Do you agree with that?

        Thanks

  2. George Russell says:

    Your list of available videos and other resources seems vast. Do you have a way of establishing what level I am currently at and from there the best route to naviagate my way through all your materials. I consider myself to be an intermediate beginner with the piano having studied from scratch for 3 years. I am mostly self taught using online programs and a small amount of individual coaching.

    • Ilinca says:

      Hi George!

      I think that you described your level perfectly! πŸ™‚ After 3 years of studying, you are an intermediate beginner. Of course, your skill level depends on many other factors – for example how many hours you practice per day, HOW you practice, what pieces you’re currently learning, are you playing scales or not, are you playing in a correct relaxed manner or not etc.

      You’ll find answers to all these questions on our forum at PianoCareerAcademy.com! This project is focused on interactive learning – it means that you don’t have to navigate your way through the available tutorials on your own. You can always ask me for help and advice! πŸ˜‰

      Whenever you have a question – post it on the forum and I’ll create written or video tutorials as a reply! This is what makes my Coaching Program unique – it is interactive, personalized and focused on solving your individual problems and dillemas.

      I’ll also tell you what tutorials from the list above are suitable for your level – and where you can start. If you want, I’ll also advise you what pieces to play next – and how to practice them. And don’t forget that you can post your audio or video recordings if you want – this will allow me to give you better practice advice!

      If you have other questions, please ask! In the meantime, you can also watch the video presentation on the front page of PianoCareerAcademy.com to learn more about the project – and read this article on the same subject.

      Have a wonderful day and I hope to see you soon on the Private Members Forum at PianoCareerAcademy.com! πŸ˜‰
      Ilinca

  3. Sheraz Khan says:

    Hello,
    I am considering registering to your plan but it would help if you can answer a few questions. Currently I’m taking classes from an experience teacher (67 years old) for the past 4 months. She has a lot of experience in teaching and also goes to boot camps to teach piano teachers. I have been learning piano all together for about a year. Time is the biggest constrain for me and I get to spend about 1 + 1/2 hours on weekdays and 3 on weekend (Sat, Sun).
    Recently we started working on Walts in A Minor (Chopin) and that’s where I realize that I lack many technicalities. Even though my teacher is experience, I see that she doesn’t have any emphasis on techniques. For example, my padding is off. Also certain passages that require me to move fast gets me stiff and my legs get stiff as well.
    Now my questions. As I understand that I can ask questions, but would I get written answer or you’d be kind enough to show in a video demonstration? You also mentioned that one can send a video for you to analyze. Does it cost extra? How much would it cost to take a private lesson if I need to? And finally there are many methods out there (Lister Sink, Taubman, Alan Fraser). How your method is better compared to those.

    Thanks a million for taking time out to answer my questions. Hope to hear from you soon.

  4. Ilinca says:

    Hi Sheraz!

    It’s very nice to meet you! πŸ˜‰

    Playing Chopin’s Waltz in A Minor (op. 34 No. 2) is a remarkable achievement after only 1 year of piano practice! Usually this piece is assigned to more advanced students!

    You’re right – for playing Chopin’s pieces we need to have a very good technical foundation. You get tensed during fast passages because you’re not practicing correctly – there are special practice methods that can gradually improve your technical agility without causing stiffness and discomfort. By the way, there are many video tutorials on this subject on PianoCareerAcademy.com! πŸ˜‰

    When you say ‘padding’, do you mean pedaling? πŸ™‚

    And now I’ll answer your questions:

    1. Yes, you can always ask questions as a member of my Piano Coaching Program. Depending on the type of your question, I will write and answer or record a video.

    For example, if you ask me ‘Could you please recommend a beautiful Invention by Bach appropriate for my level?’ – then of course I’ll post a written reply (and I’ll also send you the score).

    If, on the other hand, you ask ‘Could you please record a video and show me how to practice bars 10-20 (for example) from Chopin’s Waltz in A Minor?‘ – then of course I will record a video! πŸ˜‰

    Plus, you’ll have access to hundreds of other videos and written articles that are already available on the forum!

    2. You can always submit your own videos so I can give you practice advice – and it will NOT cost extra :).

    3. All members of my Coaching Program can also take private lessons via Skype (once you register, you will receive a 25% discount for individual lessons!).

    4. Many great pianists consider that the Russian piano school is the best piano teaching method available nowadays.

    The Russian piano school is a very complex system. It is focused on developing simultaneously and harmoniously all the musical skills of a future pianist – technique and expression, hearing and sense of rhythm, rational understanding and in-depth theoretical knowledge, imagination and feeling and so on.

    The main difference between the Russian piano school and other piano methods is its unique approach on technique and expression.

    From the very beginning, we share with our students exclusive professional secrets that help them to play with with ease, power and fluidity, with relaxed gestures, by using the whole-arm action principle (a technique that allows us to play without tension, developing a wonderful finger dexterity and a convincing expressiveness).

    From a musical point of view, another difference is our focus on expression. We teach our students how to make the piano SING, how to create emotions, how to control musical images and characters, how to create phrases and how to send the message of the piece to the audience! I cover all these subjects in all my articles and videos on PianoCareerAcademy.com!

    The Russian piano school has given the world many great pianists: Rachmaninoff, Richter, Horowitz, Gilels, Lisitsa – and the list can go on!

    I you have other questions, please ask! πŸ˜‰

    Talk soon,
    Ilinca

    • Sheraz says:

      Hello Ilinca,
      Thanks for such detail reply. Yes i’d be a great achievement if I can play the way it is supposed to be played but currently I’m struggling a bit with one part.
      Sorry yes I did mean the pedal (it was a typo).
      I have come across a few professional pianists who play with same fluidity. Knowing that Russian piano school not only focus on physical part of piano but also other aspects does make me lean more towards it. I think at this point it’s best to register the site and explore.
      I glanced at the contents and they are nicely categorized which can help individuals focus on specifics based on their needs. But do you have a predefined order if one wants to follow from scratch to make sure that he/she gets the fundamentals right. In order words an order to follow.
      Thanks

      • Ilinca says:

        You’re welcome, Sheraz! πŸ˜‰

        Yes, I recently launched on PianoCareerAcademy.com a unique project for beginners: a detailed, step-by-step video practice guide based on the famous method book The Russian School of Piano Playing by Nikolaev. 4 Lessons are already live – and I usually post a new lesson each week!

        By the way – Lesson No. 1 is available here on PianoCareer.com as well – click here to check it out! These practice guides will help you to acquire a deeper perspective on the correct fundamentals of piano playing.

        Have an awesome day and see you soon on the forum! πŸ˜‰
        Ilinca

  5. Edward says:

    I love your concept and appreciate your talent.

    Question: If I were to join your Academy, where would I know where to begin. That is, how do I judge my present skill level (i.e. advanced beginner, beginning intermediate, intermediate, etc.

    I know all the basics as far as reading sheet music and have been playing piano for about three years, but have not really practiced as much as I probably should have. Moreover, I may have been practicing in the wrong way. I would guess that I am at the beginning intermediate stage; but that is only a guess.

    I don’t want to start at the very beginning, but I do not want to start somewhere that is beyond my skill level. However, there are probably some methods you teach beginners that are better than the way I was taught.

    Thanking you in advance for your response.

    ~ edward

    • Ilinca says:

      Hi Edward!

      It’s very nice to meet you! πŸ˜‰

      Question: If I were to join your Academy, where would I know where to begin. That is, how do I judge my present skill level (i.e. advanced beginner, beginning intermediate, intermediate, etc.

      My Piano Coaching Program is not a step-by-step piano playing course. It offers an interactive learning experience – and full access to an enormous database of tutorials (videos and articles) that all levels can benefit from (starting from beginners and reaching advanced students). The tutorials are structured according to categories – making your browsing experience comfortable and enjoyable.

      For example – at the moment, our forum has more than 100 members – and their levels range from absolute beginners to professional teachers that want to take their skills to the next level :). They all have the possibility of watching/reading ANY tutorial they choose – depending on their exact needs and goals at the moment. And don’t forget that at any moment you can ask for my guidance and advice! πŸ˜‰

      However, there IS one step-by-step Video Practice Guide that you can follow as a member of our forum: it is the Practice Guide for Beginners based on Nikolaev’s Russian School of Piano Playing. Even though you’re not an absolute beginner, these videos will still offer you a deeper insight into the professional secrets of the Russian piano school, helping you to reevaluate and improve your posture, key attack, sound quality, expressive skills and technique. You can start from Lesson No. 1 – or from any other Lesson you like (32 Lessons are Live at the moment and I post a new Lesson each week, on Thursday).

      Moreover, I may have been practicing in the wrong way.

      In just a couple of months on our forum, you will learn all the basics of correct practice – so that every practice session will be enjoyable and extremely productive! πŸ˜‰

      In rest, you’ll have full access to hundreds of videos and articles focused on the most important aspects of piano playing (and sharing the professional principles of the Russian piano school): posture and key attack, relaxation and whole-arm action, technique and expression, detailed practice tips for certain pieces, pedaling tips, correct practice, performance, repertoire (with LOTS of attached scores!!!), theory, analysis, history, health, motivational videos – and the list can go on (not to mention our supportive community of piano enthusiasts and the thousands of captivating piano conversations!).

      I’m looking forward to welcoming you to our community! πŸ˜‰
      Ilinca

  6. Michael says:

    Hello Ilinca,

    First of all, thank you for enlightening me on the pedaling secrets. I asked my piano teacher last year if there was more than “up and down” because I had myself begun to experiment a little. I was practising Chopin’s Waltz op 69 no.2 and just couldn’t get rid of the unclean sound, using the standard pedal instructions from the score. I loved the way Ashkenazy used the pedal (there is a youtube video with the score), it almost seems like he is using sustain on the left hand but not on the right hand, or the other way round, more pedal on the first bar , less on the second… anyways my teacher (who is a concert pianist but not my teacher anymore!) answered “no”! No half pedal, no difference in when to press down the pedal, just the standard application as written in the score. My God, was that frustrating to hear, I’ve never liked to accept a “no” from an authority, but this really upset me inside. Sorry for writing so much, but I wanted to share, how much of an eyeopener and a confirmation of the hunch I had, you were.

    But now, to my questions:

    1. I am interested in signing up, but for financial reasons, had to sell my Grand Piano and currently cannot afford getting a piano (possibly for another 6 months) You mentioned in June that you already had 100 forum members, what’s the limit of members and how much time would you estimate, do I have until you reach the limit?

    2. I am 41 years old, practiced electronic organ with weekly private lessons from 10 until 16/17 years old. 4 years ago I bought my childhood dream – an old Steinway Baby Grand (which I unfortunately had to sell again a couple of months ago). I was lacking left hand practice and music theory and sight reading (until today I have a hard time reading the bass clef), and it takes so much time to be able to play a piece. It is my dream to play the piano, as my dear friend Jan Lisiecki once said, as if it was an extension of my body. While I know that I will never reach that level, I would still like to make the piano do what I want it to do, control the sound, rhythm, volume (I feel like the piano is doing what IT wants) and be able to listen to my play as if listening to somebody else play. Do you think I still have a chance to attain that?

    Thank you for taking your time reading all this.

    Michael

  7. eugenio says:

    hola Ilinca :
    estoy interesado en este curso pero quisiera recibir toda la informaciΓ³n en idioma espaΓ±ol
    gracias por tomarse el tiempo de leer esto

    atentamente:
    Eugenio

    • Ilinca says:

      Hola Eugenio!

      All the information (hundreds of video and written tutorials) available for the members of my Piano Coaching Program at PianoCareerAcademy.com is in English. When/if I find the possibility to translate it to Spanish or to other languages – I will immediately announce all my subscribers! πŸ˜‰

      Cheers,
      Ilinca

  8. Ricky says:

    Where can I find the sheet music for O Christmas Tree? Thanks.

  9. Sergio says:

    Hello Ilinca!
    First, let me tell you that your free video tutorials that I’ve been able to watch are amazing in a professional and pragmatic manner. I embrace the holistic approach that the Russian method follows and that is why I’m seriously considering joining Piano Career Academy.

    I have started to learn piano very late: I’m 36. My strenghts are: a deep motivation (which drives me to practice at about 2 hours daily), a passion for piano ( I’ve collecetd and listened to jazz a classical piano players’ albums since I was 16) a creative personality (I think I am good at drawing and illustrtaion and brainstorming ) and a personal commitmemt ( every single step in playing this wonderful piano, as small as it can be, is deeply rewarding for me).

    On the other hand, my weaknesses are: too nervous and not easy to be focused on each step( it’s hard for me not to speed up while playing which leads me towards numerous mistakes), a tendency to stiffen my forearms, poorly skilled to keep rhythm, etc. I tend to get bored easily Fter long periods of practicong the hard parts of a song and end up playing chords and having fun with the piano in a improvised but disordered way.Did I mention being too self-demanding and having small hands? haha.

    I’ve been learning piano with a private teacher for seven months now. My practice can be reduced to practicing scales for 30 minutes ( including some jazz voicings), studying sheet reading and music theory and, finally, some short compositions
    ( popular and some classical in a low and mid-beginmer format). My teacher doesn’t give me clear advice or guidelines of how to practice and keep a right posture.

    After giving you a picture of my case ( I hope it was concise enough!), my questions are:

    Can I benefit from your course even though my goals are to play mainly ( but not only) jazz in teh very long run?

    Can we have acces to the course in a monthly basis at our convenience or are we to pay the annual tuition?

    Thanks Ilinca for reading my message.
    Congratulations for your fantastic work.
    Sergio

    • Ilinca says:

      Hi Sergio!

      It’s very nice to meet you! πŸ˜‰

      My assistant Natalia will send you a reply via email a little later today! πŸ™‚

      Cheers,
      Ilinca

  10. cynthia says:

    Hi Ilinca,

    Love your teaching style. Are you planning on making a video lesson on Chopin’s Nocturne Op 9, No 2 ? I’ve been playing it for a while but just not quite happy with it. I am missing something….. something very subtle…. I wish you will make video for it soon !

    Thanks,
    Cynthia